National Science Week

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National Science Week 2017 took place from August 12 to 20, with a record 2,100+ events around the country.

The media alerts, stories and talent highlights we’ve shared are included below.

You can see some of the Science Week stories on social media via

For more information contact: Tanya Ha on scienceweek@scienceinpublic.com.au, 0404 083 863 or (03) 9398 1416.

Images are available here

National Science Week 2018 will take place 11 – 19 August.

In the interim you can get in touch with the state coordinators, sign up for the National Science Week newsletter for news of grant rounds and other information, or visit the Science Week website www.scienceweek.net.au

Are you a slave to your smartphones? Or master of your mobile?

We spend three hours a day on our phones, on average, with almost one in five of us admitting we check our phone at least once every 15 minutes.

These are some of the early findings from Australia’s Biggest Smartphone Survey, which is looking at how we use our smartphones and how we feel about them.

More than 10,000 people have taken part in the survey so far, but there’s still plenty of time to participate with the survey running until Friday, August 25.

In particular, researchers want to hear from more young people, especially those aged between 12 and 25.

Psychology PhD student Bep Uink from Murdoch University, says: “Young Australians are digital natives so it’s possible they have more sophisticated relationships with their smartphones than their parents’ generation.”

“It’s really important for researchers to hear from young people about the benefits they get from their smartphones, and conversely the downsides of having such a ubiquitous device in their lives, that we might not otherwise be aware of,” she says.

Other early findings from the survey show: [click to continue…]

Super Hornet simulators; sporty science; Robotronica; Aboriginal astronomy; Pokémon GO with real animals; and more

Sunday 20 August 2017

Highlights for the final day of National Science Week

142 events and exhibitions, 16 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

National and international talent, researchers, experts, and other interesting people available for interview around the country. Plenty of photo opportunities.

Sydney

Gold Coast

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Sex, genes and rock ‘n’ roll; inside a dodgy drug lab; physics of recycling; and more

Saturday 19 August 2017

Highlights for day eight of National Science Week’s nine-day ‘week’

177 events and exhibitions, 16 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

National and international talent, researchers, experts, and other interesting people available for interview around the country. Plenty of photo opportunities.

Hobart

Perth

Blue Mountains

Canberra

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Keeping the lights on; Mayan astronomy; Whisky Academy; bull science; and more

Friday 18 August 2017

Highlights for day seven of National Science Week

446 events and exhibitions, 23 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

National and international talent, researchers, experts, and other interesting people available for interview around the country. Plenty of photo opportunities.

Melbourne

Sydney

Darwin

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Our earthquake science epicenter; new recycling plant opening; ‘tree lobsters’ and peacock spiders; the physics of beer; and more

Dozens of stories and interesting people at 120+ Science Week events in ACT

  • Opening of Canberra’s re-vamped recycling facility…tour the facility, meet the experts and see how physics sorts trash from treasure. Drone footage available.
  • ‘Tree lobster’ stick insects and small peacock spiders on the big screen. And meet the man who discovered these tiny dancing spiders.
  • Scienceability: young adults with a disability running a free science workshop open to the public.
  • Ask scientists to explain physics using beer.
  • Geoscience Australia open day—see inside Australia’s epicenter for earthquake detection, how we use satellites to find water for agriculture, and precious rocks for our smartphones.
  • Dancing with the Science Stars: astronomy, gravitational waves and Antarctic research explained…with the help of dancers.
  • 1,000 science Scouts and Guides saving the planet.
  • How to turn a ‘dead’ seed into a living plant.
  • Do you have a healthy relationship with your smartphone? Researchers want to know.

More on these highlights below, and others at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week, and on Twitter at @SciWKMedia.

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The botany of booze; drones on the farm; wildlife forensics; plastic oceans; and more

Thursday 17 August 2017

Highlights from day six of National Science Week

448 events and exhibitions, 22 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

National and international talent, researchers, experts, and other interesting people available for interview around the country. Plenty of photo opportunities.

Sydney

Charters Towers (near Townsville)

Hobart

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The ‘Madhouse Effect’; evil weevils; the funniest physicist; the language of plants; dingo puppies; and more

Wednesday 16 August 2017

Highlights from day five of National Science Week

476 events and exhibitions, 22 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

National and international talent, researchers, experts, and other interesting people available for interview around the country. Plenty of photo opportunities.

Canberra (10am, Parliament House)

Sydney

Melbourne

Western Australia and South Australia

Perth [click to continue…]

From Antarctica to ocean plastics, and fighting MS to the science of whisky…Tassie science on show

Dozens of stories and interesting people at 150+ Science Week events in Tasmania

  • The barista scientist, the insect lover, and other Young Tassie Scientists tour the state.
  • What did a voyage to Antarctica tell us about women in science? Meet the scientist studying the scientists.
  • What do rabbits and sea urchins taste like? Fighting invasive species by making them gourmet—Launceston.
  • Behind the scenes—how do you make an Attenborough documentary?
  • From the ocean’s food chain to the good oil, why krill is crucial, and why Hobart is the krill capital.
  • Whisky Academy: the science behind Tassie’s whisky boom—Strahan.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: meet the Tassie scientists looking for solutions for the 23,000 Australians affected.
  • Fluorescence—from forensic science to highlighter pens and spinach. Sydney chemist Elizabeth New reveals all.
  • Tasmanian climate science experts on the big changes that are happening in our oceans and ice—local differences in global warming, sea level rise, acidification and reefs—Sandy Bay and Launceston.
  • Trash in the tummies of seabirds, microplastics, and a surfboard fin made from recycled plastic waste: the problems and solutions of ocean plastic pollution.
  • Do you have a healthy relationship with your smartphone? Researchers want to know.

More on these highlights below, and others at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week, and on Twitter at @SciWKMedia.

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Making a black hole; Fred Astaire; quantum physics explained by electric guitar; biomedical and renewable energy summits; and more

Highlights from Day 3 of National Science Week

344 events and exhibitions, 19 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent, including:

Canberra (Parliament House): Innovating Energy Summit: how will we power our future?

Canberra: Ask the Interstellar visual effects wiz how to make a black hole on the big screen believable.

Melbourne: Will Australia’s biomedical research future be as bright as our past achievements? With Gustav Nossal, Anne Kelso and other research leaders.

Sydney:

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Green energy in the Red Centre; moving to Mars; shark science; and more

Sunday 13 August 2017

Highlights from Day 2 of National Science Week

157 events and exhibitions, 16 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent, including:

Melbourne:

Sydney:

Adelaide:

Townsville: Earth 2.0: are we moving to Mars?

Launceston: Beetles, bugs, spiders and creepy crawlies at QVMAG Science Open Season.

Canberra: What brings seeds to life? Germination in the nation’s capital.

Perth:

Alice Springs: Can Alice Springs be 100% renewable energy powered by 2030?

Online: How healthy is your relationship with your smartphone? Scientists want to know.

More than 173 events, exhibitions and online activities on offer around the country today.

National and international talent, researchers, experts, and other interesting people available for interview around the country. Plenty of photo opportunities.

For general Science Week media enquiries:

National Science Week has become one of Australia’s largest festivals. Last year saw a staggering 1.3 million people participate in more than 1,800 events and activities.

In 2017, National Science Week celebrates its 20th birthday, with 2,000+ events registered throughout Australia— from insect Olympics in Darwin to ‘Blood’ at Melbourne’s new Science Gallery, to Antarctic science in the Apple Isle—with everything from science festivals, music and comedy shows, expert panel discussions, interactive hands-on displays, open days and online activities.

The festival is proudly supported by the Australian Government; partners CSIRO, the Australian Science Teachers Association and the ABC; and sponsors Cosmos, Discovery Science, New Scientist and Popular Science.

Visit the National Science Week website for the details of events in your area: www.scienceweek.net.au.

Your brain on fake news; an insect festival; science graffiti; and more

Saturday 12 August 2017

Highlights from Day 1 of National Science Week

170 events and exhibitions, 17 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent, including:

Sydney: Your brain on fake news.

Canberra: What do you get when science meets street art? See ‘Co-Lab’ at Science in ACTion.

Bendigo: Before Hidden Figures, women made The Glass Universe, with US author Dava Sobel.

Melbourne: How does the smell of BLOOD make you feel? at the Science Gallery Melbourne.

Hobart: Ethical farming, the science of piracy and Hobart Hackerspace at the Festival of Bright Ideas

Adelaide: How does your brain work? [click to continue…]

An eco-apocalyptic circus; insect Olympics; green energy in the red centre; and more

Dozens of stories and interesting people at 80+ Science Week events in the Top End

  • Artists and Circus Oz performers explore climate change.
  • Bush foods, food waste as fuel, and science in the garden with Costa Georgiardis at the desertSMART EcoFair—Alice Springs
  • Can Alice Springs be 100% renewable energy powered by 2030?
  • What do midges have to do with chocolate? Find out at the Darwin Insect Festival.
  • Politicians get a grip (test): HealthLAB visits Parliament House.
  • Meet the science writer who turned 13 sea voyages in three years into a book and a play. And hear from her on science, journalism and telling the stories of climate change.
  • From suspended schoolboy to educational pioneer: 17-year-old innovator Taj Jabari.
  • Meet Fergus the tawny frogmouth, Mr Slithers the snake, and other Top End wildlife.
  • Are you addicted to your smartphone? Researchers want to know.

More on these highlights below, and others at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week, and on Twitter at @SciWKMedia. [click to continue…]

Mayan astronomy; biomedical future; black holes on the big screen; a bloody Science Gallery; and more

Dozens of stories and interesting people at 325+ Science Week events in Victoria

  • Art meets science in BLOOD: Attract & Repel.
  • A virtual reality look inside a plant cell.
  • The science of food at Queen Victoria Market.
  • Game your children’s interesting in science.
  • Will Australia’s biomedical research future be as bright as our past achievements? With Gustav Nossal, Anne Kelso and other research leaders.
  • What do actress Hedy Lamarr, nuclear physicist Lise Meitner and Nobel winner Marie Curie have in common? Their science stories on stage.
  • Ask the Interstellar visual effects wiz how to make a black hole on the big screen believable.
  • Can science make the world’s most liveable city even better?
  • Are your genes your destiny? Gattaca 20 years on.
  • What can we learn about ancient astronomy from Mayan ruins? Ask an expert from Honduras.
  • Do you have a healthy relationship with your smartphone? Researchers want to know.

More on these highlights below, and others at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week, and on Twitter at @SciWKMedia.

Scientists and event organisers are available for interview throughout Science Week. Read on for contact details for each event, or call:

About National Science Week

National Science Week has become one of Australia’s largest festivals. Last year saw a staggering 1.3 million people participate in more than 1,800 events and activities.

In 2017, National Science Week celebrates its 20th birthday, with events held throughout Australia— from insect Olympics in Darwin to ‘Blood’ at Melbourne’s new Science Gallery, to Antarctic science in the Apple Isle—with everything from science festivals, music and comedy shows, expert panel discussions, interactive hands-on displays, open days and online activities.

The festival is proudly supported by the Australian Government; partners CSIRO, the Australian Science Teachers Association and the ABC; and sponsors Cosmos, Discovery Science, New Scientist and Popular Science.

National Science Week 2017 will run from 12 – 20 August. Find an event at www.scienceweek.net.au.

More about the event highlights

Blood—is it art? Is it science?

Science Gallery Melbourne is giving us a taste of what to expect when it sets up permanently in 2020, combining art, science and controversy with its pop-up exhibition.

BLOOD: Attract & Repel features 22 works which address the themes of taboo, stigma, identity, giving, health, future.

As well as international artists, the exhibition also involves many of The University of Melbourne’s staff and students – from almost all disciplines; only the business and architecture streams are not involved – and a curatorial advisory panel like few other galleries, among them a cardiologist, a haematologist, an Indigenous bio-artist and a performance art lecturer.

Embedded at the University of Melbourne, Science Gallery Melbourne will involve, inspire and transform curious minds through arts and science.

Tuesday 25 July – Thursday 5 October Event details

Talent available for interviews:

  • Rose Hiscock – Science Gallery Melbourne director
  • Ryan Jeffries – Blood creative director

Media enquiries: Katrina Hall – kathall@ozemail.com

Event enquiries: Lee Casey, info@melbourne.sciencegallery.com or 03 9035 4484

Market of the Mind—Queensbridge Square, Southbank

Socialise with science after work at Market of the Mind in Southbank, with ice-sculpture, inside-out people, a virtual reality look inside a plant cell, and taste fine wines from the grapes CSIRO developed to suit Australia’s growing conditions.

Friday 11 August. Event details

Media enquiries: Carly Siebentritt, carly.siebentritt@csiro.au or 03 9545 2615

Living Science at Queen Vic Market—Melbourne

A day of food, facts and fun for the whole family at Queen Victoria Market, with DNA from fruit, zebrafish embryos, liquid nitrogen shows, hands-on experiments, and a marine touch tank.

Sunday 13 August. Event details

Media enquiries: Carly Siebentritt, carly.siebentritt@csiro.au or 03 9545 2615

Game your kids’ science skills at family science games nights—Warrnambool, Geelong and Burwood

Gaming is an ideal means of engaging participants in science. Science games nights in Warrnambool, Geelong and Burwood will provide participants with the opportunity to play a variety of games relating to different scientific concepts and skills that they may not have previously thought about.

The games provide a fun and exciting avenue for exploring scientific concepts that are normally difficult to relate to and which might be perceived as too difficult to understand or not relevant to participants’ lives.

Each child attending will be given a ‘science games bag’ with science games and information about resources that will enable them to pursue their interest in playing or creating science games.

Warrnambool on Monday 14, Geelong on Wednesday 16, and Burwood on Friday 18 August Event details

Media enquiries: John Cripps Clark, john.crippsclark@deakin.edu.au 03 924 46467 or 0403 878 021

Buffeted by Global Headwinds: Challenges Facing Biomedical Research—South Wharf

Biomedical research in Australia has a distinguished history with our universities, medical research institutes and hospitals ensuring we enjoy high standards of health and care. Our contribution to health and well-being is recognized internationally: half of Australia’s sixteen Nobel Prize recipients received the award for either Physiology or Medicine.

The Convergence Science Network brings together a distinguished panel—including Sir Gustav Nossal, Prof Anne Kelso, Prof John Carroll, and MC Dr Rachel Nowak—for a public conversation about the state of biomedical research in Australia. This is an opportunity to understand the headwinds biomedical research faces and to have a say about how we might respond, to ensure we remain a nation that not only enjoys the benefits of cutting edge health care but contributes to a world where good health is not only the preserve of wealthy nations.

Monday 14 August. Event details

Event enquiries: Luan Ismahil, l.ismahil@convergenceScienceNetwork.org.au or 03 8344 8405

Curie Meitner LaMarr Indivisible—Clayton

Radiation. Nuclear fission. Frequency hopping.

These discoveries are made by women – double Nobel Prize winner and discoverer of radioactivity Marie Curie, the Austrian-Swedish nuclear physicist Lise Meitner and the Viennese Hollywood actress Hedy Lamarr with the invention of frequency hopping.

As pioneers in their chosen fields in the early 20th century, what triumphs and challenges have they faced in both their personal and professional lives as they battle a world where science is thought of as a male endeavour?

The Monash School of Physics and Astronomy presents Curie Meitner Lamarr Indivisible – a play featuring the stories of these three remarkable women who have challenged the assumptions of their day that women are viewed as incapable of advanced abstract thought.

Directed by Sandra Shuddekopf, with the three scientists portrayed by Austrian improv actress Anita Zieher and staged by Viennese theatre group portraitheater.

Tuesday 15 August. Event details

Wednesday 16 August. Event details

Media enquiries: Silvia Dropulich, silvia.dropulich@.monash.edu, 03 9902 4513 or 0435 138 743

See Interstellar with the guy behind the visual effects—Melbourne, VIC

How do you build a black hole for the big screen? And make it convincing, entertaining and true to the science?

See the movie Interstellar—in which a team of researchers must find a way through a wormhole to a new home for humanity—and hear a short talk and Q&A with Oliver James, the Chief Scientist from Double Negative, the team responsible for bringing the science behind Interstellar to life.

Melbourne (Mornington): Wednesday 16 August. Event details

Media enquiries: Brad Tucker brad@mso.anu.edu.au, 02 6125 6711 or 0433 905 777

Can science make the world’s most liveable city better?—Melbourne, VIC

Melbourne has ranked as the ‘world’s most liveable city’ for the seventh consecutive year.

What does science and research reveal about Melbourne’s future liveability?

Dr Anthony Boxshall (Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientist, longtime 3RRR presenter, and Principal Fellow at University of Melbourne) will host a panel discussion of the science of Melbourne’s liveability, from air quality to train tunnels to behavior change. With panelists:

  • Walkability and healthy urbanism expert Billie Giles-Corti

Distinguished Professor, NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow, Director RMIT Urban Futures Enabling Capability Platform, Director Healthy Liveable Cities Group

  • Architecture guru and lead researcher at the Sagrada Familia Basilica (Barcelona) Mark Burry

Director of the Smart Cities Research Institute, Swinburne University of Technology

  • City planner Andy Fergus

Urban Designer for City of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Design, Melbourne Architours

  • Behaviour change researcher Sarah Kneebone

Research Fellow at BehaviourWorks Australia, Monash Sustainable Development Institute

Friday 18 August. Event details The event will also be livestreamed online.

Anthony Boxshall and Andrea Hinwood, Victoria’s Chief Environmental Scientist, are available for interview.

Media enquiries: John Rees, john.rees@epa.vic.gov.au or 03 9695 2903

Gattaca: Are your genes your destiny?—Melbourne, VIC

How close is Gattaca to reality, 20 years on from its cinema release? Are we choosing the gender of our children? Are we creating designer babies? Are we profiling people with DNA?

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the sci-fi film Gattaca. This modern classic explores the consequences of genetic selection and manipulation on society through the eyes of genetically less-than-perfect Vincent (Ethan Hawke) and genetically perfect Irene (Uma Thurman).

This event is a screening of Gattaca, followed by an expert panel discussion of the science, art and ethics of the movie. Scientists are available for interview.

Friday 18 August. Event details

Media contact: Jacqueline Savard, Jacqueline.savard@sydney.edu.au, 02 9036 3427 or 0406 484 170

Mayan Astronomy—Emerald, VIC

What can we learn about ancient astronomy from the remains of a lost civilisation?

The Mayan Classic period (250 CE- 900CE) was the height of the arts, astronomy, architecture and urbanism for the Maya. Observations of the celestial landscape arise in sculptures, buildings, calendars, numbering, writings and all Mayan cultural expressions.

Mount Burnett Observatory and Emerald Secondary College are hosting a mini festival of astronomy, with telescopes, interactive activities for the kids and a lecture by Dr Javier Mejuto on Mayan Astronomy.

Visiting academic Dr Mejuto (Professor of Cultural Astronomy at the National Autonomous University in Honduras) will share his knowledge of Mayan Astronomy. He will focus on Copan Ruinas—a site known for outstanding architecture and symbolic language that shows the role of time and cosmos in the religion, rituals, and social ends of the Mayan people.

Friday 18 August. Event details

Dr Javier Mejuto and Dr James Murray will be available for interview.

Media enquiries: James Murray, jamesrhysmurray@gmail.com or 0409 703 929

Australia’s Biggest Smartphone Survey—national

Are you a slave to your smartphone? Or have you mastered your mobile? Researchers want your help to build a deeper understanding of our relationship with our smartphones.

Take part in Australia’s Biggest Smartphone Survey—the online project for National Science Week.

How has having a smartphone changed your life? Has it made your life easier? Or harder? How much time do you spend on it? Does it help you connect (or disconnect) with people? And could you live without it?

The survey will run on the ABC website for two weeks from Friday 11 August. Join in by heading to the Smartphone Survey website at www.smartphonesurvey.net.au.

Several researchers and science communicators are available for interviews.

Media enquiries: Suzannah Lyons suzannah@scienceinpublic.com.au, 03 9398 1416 or 0409 689 543

How healthy is your relationship with your smartphone?

Are you a slave to your smartphone? Or have you mastered your mobile?

Researchers want your help to build a deeper understanding of our relationship with our smartphones.

Take part in Australia’s Biggest Smartphone Survey—the online project for National Science Week.

How has having a smartphone changed your life?

Has it made your life easier? Or harder? How much time do you spend on it? Does it help you connect (or disconnect) with people? And could you live without it?

Australia’s Biggest Smartphone Survey is asking you to share how you use your smartphone and what impact this ubiquitous device is having on your life.

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Dozens of stories and interesting people at 190+ Science Week events in SA

Science for ageing gracefully; cab sav chemistry; dinosaurs amongst us; and more

  • Who will win SA’s top science awards? And who are the unsung heroes?
  • Fighting cancer, virtual reality, and light and colour at our newest festival Big Science Adelaide.
  • What gives wine its colour, flavour and texture? Ask a wine scientist (yes, that’s a profession!).
  • Young scientists have healthy insights for seniors, from dementia to active ageing to hip replacements.
  • Are quotas the answer for women in science? Ask them.
  • Bioprospecting, climate change, and the rise of China: why should we care about Antarctic research?
  • Battle of the brains: who is the best, brightest and funniest physicist?
  • Ask the singing palaeontologist about dancing with the ‘dinosaurs amongst us’.
  • See a mobile astronomy observatory on wheels in Port Augusta.
  • The megafauna fossils of Naracoorte Caves.
  • Do you have a healthy relationship with your smartphone?

More on these highlights below, and others at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week, and on Twitter at @SciWkMedia.

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National Science Week 2017 showcases key importance of science to the community

Press release from: Senator The Hon Arthur Sinodinous AO, Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science and Senator for NSW

National Science Week, which I am delighted to launch today, provides a valuable opportunity for all Australians to meet scientists, discuss hot topics, do science and celebrate its discoveries and impact on our society.

This is the 20th anniversary of National Science Week and it will be held from 12-20 August.

It has become one of Australia’s biggest festivals with 1.3 million people expected to participate in more than 2000 events, including hands-on and online activities and competitions from the Tiwi Islands to Antarctica and Christmas Island to Cape York.
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Bumper program of National Science Week events to inspire families about wonders of STEM

Media release posted on behalf of the New South Wales National Science Week Coordinating Committee and the Office of the NSW Chief Scientist

10 August 2017

Communities across New South Wales will have their eyes opened to the wonders of science and technology through a packed program of National Science Week events.

Close to 600 fun and family-friendly events will be hosted by universities, museums and research organisations across the state as part of the annual celebration of science, technology and innovation.

National Science Week, now in its 21st year, provides an opportunity to acknowledge the contribution of Australian scientists to the world of knowledge.

NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer, Mary O’Kane, says it also seeks to foster a love of science in young Australians.

“National Science Week is a chance not only to celebrate really great achievements and advances in science; but also to stir our next generation of science minds,” Professor O’Kane said.

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Dozens of stories and interesting people at 300+ Science Week events in WA

Neuroscience meets music; Indigenous engineers; the maths of primordial soup; and more

  • From suspended schoolboy to educational pioneer: 17-year-old innovator and 2014 Australian Young Innovator of the Year Taj Pabari, in WA for the Perth Science Festival
  • Western Australians to find out what’s lurking in their pantry
  • Are your genes your destiny? How close is Gattaca to reality, 20 years on?
  • Great Southern Science to be showcased at one-day conference in Albany
  • Who will be WA’s Scientist of the Year? Find out Monday 14 August
  • A prospective Martian—Mars One candidate Josh Richards launches his new book, following his quest to become a Martian
  • Bush tucker and behind-the-scenes tour of BoM in Geraldton
  • Scientist and mathematician Dr Rowena Ball on the origins of life, in Geraldton
  • Mock drug lab, blood and gore, solving crimes, making ice-cream, and bring your own soil sample to the ChemCentre Open Day in Bentley
  • What role did WA play in the discovery of gravitational waves? Plus… Galileo, blackholes and more in Gingin
  • Stories of Indigenous engineers in Kalgoorlie
  • Do you have a healthy relationship with your smartphone?
  • And science festivals in Perth, Geraldton, Albany, Gingin and Kalgoorlie.

More on these highlights below, and others at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week, and on Twitter at @SciWKMedia.

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Dozens of stories and interesting people at 260+ Science Week events in Queensland

Scientists in the shopping mall; the science behind the energy crisis; forensic facial reconstruction; and more

Brisbane

  • Remarkable science careers: TV presenting, engineering sports tech, immunology with worms, and putting parasites in a book for kids
  • Are batteries the answer for keeping the lights on? What’s Australia’s energy crisis all about? Find out at the Big Picture Energy talks
  • Commonwealth Games sports science, medical science and making slime at Westfield
  • Meet the curators, and a science sleepover at Queensland Museum
  • The science of fireworks with the Brisbane Broncos
  • Meet the ‘farmer robot’ at Street Science at EKKA
  • Battle of the brains: who is the funniest physicist?
  • Find out how facial forensic reconstruction works from the scientist whose work helped identify a Belanglo victim—also in Toowoomba

Regional Queensland

  • Microbes cleaning up mine sites, how the land effects the Reef, and an ancient fanged kangaroo—talk with science’s female rising stars, touring Cairns, Cloncurry, Mt Isa, and more
  • New MacDonald has a drone: how science is shaping rural futures—Charters Towers
  • Art-science experiences in the tropics at Cairns

Everywhere: do you have a healthy relationship with your smartphone?

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