CSL Florey Medal

The 2017 CSL Florey Medal will be awarded on Wednesday 6 December at the Australian Association of Medical Research Institutes (AAMRI) Dinner at Parliament House in Canberra.

The biennial CSL Florey Medal honours Australian researchers who have had significant achievements in biomedical science and/or in advancing human health.

The 2017 CSL Florey Medal winner is Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy from the University of Western Australia, awarded for her work pioneering gene therapy for the treatment of eye diseases. Read more about her work below.

In alternate years, CSL awards the Young Florey Medal to an Australian biomedical researcher for significant early career achievements in biomedical science and/or human health advancement for research conducted primarily in Australia.

The 2016 winner was Mark Kendall, from The University of Queensland, a rocket scientist who is reinventing vaccination.

For more information, contact:

  • Tanya Ha on tanya@scienceinpublic.com.au or 0404 083 863
  • Niall Byrne on niall@scienceinpublic.com.au
  • or call the office on (03) 9398 1416.

www.aips.net.au/news-events/the-florey-medal

2017 CSL Florey Medal – photos from the award night

The Hon Greg Hunt MP, Minister for Health presents Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy with her medal (Photo credit: AAMRI/Brad Cummings Photography)

Elizabeth Rakoczy in conversation with Bernie Hobbs. Photographed at the AAMRI dinner event in the Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra. 6 December 2017. (Photo credit: AAMRI/Brad Cummings Photography)

Elizabeth Rakoczy in conversation with Bernie Hobbs. Photographed at the AAMRI dinner event in the Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra. 6 December 2017. (Photo credit: AAMRI/Brad Cummings Photography)

Media kit: 2017 CSL Florey Medal

Using viruses to restore sight

 

Researcher restoring sight Elizabeth Rakoczy (UWA) wins $50,000 CSL Florey Medal for lifetime achievement


Press materials available

Media contacts:

The 2017 CSL  Florey Medal will be presented at the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes (AAMRI) dinner on Wednesday 6 December in the Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra

  • Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy has developed a process to turn eye cells into bio-factories, making their own medication on the spot.
  • This gene therapy uses a modified virus to carry a gene into cells in the eye, replacing the need for frequent, painful and costly eye injections.
  • Elizabeth led the world’s first human gene therapy trial for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly.
  • Past CSL Florey Medallists include Graeme Clark, Ian Frazer, and Nobel Laureates Barry Marshall and Robin Warren.

[click to continue…]

Using viruses to restore sight – 2017 CSL Florey Medal winner profile

Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy, the University of Western Australia

Molecular ophthalmologist developing new treatments for eye diseases wins $50,000 CSL Florey Medal for lifetime achievement

 

Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy is modifying viruses to use their powers for good. She’s created a new gene therapy for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) that is reversing vision loss in clinical trial patients. Her treatment means one injection instead of several per year.

Modified viruses are gene therapy’s delivery vehicles, taking genes directly into cells. Elizabeth first showed that they could carry a healthy replacement for a mutated gene that causes degeneration of the eye’s retina. She then showed they can deliver instructions for eye cells to form a bio-factory to produce their own treatment for wet AMD, a more complex eye disease. [click to continue…]

2017 CSL Florey Medal – photos

Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy, winner of the 2017 CSL Florey Medal (Photo credit: Lions Eye Institute, UWA)

Professor Elizabeth Rakoczy with Molecular Ophthalmology team colleagues Dr Aaron Magno and Assistant Professor May Lai (Photo credit: Lions Eye Institute, UWA)

[click to continue…]

Media Kit – 2016 CSL Young Florey Medal

After 160 years, it’s time to throw away the needle and syringe
Nanopatch starts clinical trials in Brisbane, with Cuba next

Rocket scientist Mark Kendall (UQ) reinvents vaccination and wins $25,000 CSL Young Florey Medal

Press materials available:

The 2016 CSL Young Florey Medal was presented at the Association of Australian medical Research Institutes (AAMRI) dinner at on Wednesday 9 November in the Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra

  • Professor Mark Kendall helped create a small rocket for vaccine delivery.
  • Then he invented a radically simpler concept that could replace the needle and syringe we’ve been using for 160 years.
  • A small square of silicon with 20,000 microscopic spikes delivers vaccines directly to the skin’s immune cells.
  • It’s painless, requires a fraction of the dose, doesn’t need refrigeration, and eliminates needle phobia.
  • Now human clinical trials are underway in Brisbane, and the WHO is planning a polio vaccine trial in Cuba in 2017.

[click to continue…]

After 160 years, it’s time to move on from the needle and syringe

Professor Mark Kendall, University of Queensland

2016 CSL Young Florey Medal

 

mark_kendallProfessor Mark Kendall is planning to dispatch the 160-year-old needle and syringe to history. This Queensland rocket scientist has invented a new vaccine technology that’s painless, uses a fraction of the dose, puts the vaccine just under the skin, and doesn’t require a fridge.

Human trials of Mark’s Nanopatch are underway in Australia, and the concept has broad patent coverage. It’s being supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Merck and the WHO. A polio vaccine trial is being planned for Cuba in 2017.  

But it’s not been an easy path. Mark has had to push the science and business worlds to see the value of a new approach to vaccine delivery. It took 70 presentations before he secured funding for the UQ spin-out company Vaxxas.

[click to continue…]

Media materials – 2015 CSL Florey Medal

The ageing brain can repair itself

National honour for pioneer who found brain stem cells and is now waking them up with exercise

Professor Perry Bartlett from the Queensland Brain Institute at UQ received the 2015 CSL Florey Medal for his discoveries that have transformed our understanding of the brain, and for his leadership of neuroscience in Australia.

Media opportunities

Perry is available for interview in Canberra on Wednesday 11 and Thursday 12 November

The award was presented by Health Minister the Hon. Sussan Ley on Wednesday in the Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra

[click to continue…]

The ageing brain can repair itself

2015 CSL Florey header_lo res

National honour for pioneer who found brain stem cells and is now waking them up with exercise

Media release

Full profile, photos, and HD footage available at: www.scienceinpublic.com.au/floreymedal

The award was presented by Health Minister the Hon. Sussan Ley on Wednesday 11 November in the Great Hall, Parliament House, Canberra

  • Professor Perry Bartlett broke the dogma that the adult brain can’t change and regenerate
  • He built the Queensland Brain Institute to expand our knowledge of what the brain can do
  • Now he’s starting a trial to put people with dementia on treadmills, in the hope that their neurons will regrow
  • Perry  will receive the 2015 CSL Florey Medal at the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes (AAMRI) Dinner in Parliament House for his discoveries that have transformed our understanding of the brain, and for his leadership of neuroscience in Australia.

[click to continue…]

Discovering brain stem cells and waking them up with exercise

DSC_3314Professor Perry Bartlett is putting people with dementia on treadmills. He has already reversed dementia and recovered spatial memories in mice through exercise. During the next year he’ll find out if exercise will have the same impact on people with dementia. Then he’ll look at depression.

Underpinning these projects is the idea that the brain is constantly changing and that learning, memory, mood and many other brain functions are, in part, regulated by the production of new neurons. When Perry started exploring the brain in 1977, the mature brain was regarded as static and unchangeable. He challenged this dogma and his work has led to a transformation in our understanding of the brain. [click to continue…]

Saving young lives by the million – Melbourne researcher wins $50,000 CSL Florey Medal

Professor Ruth Bishop in the Rotavirus lab (Credit: Stepping Stone Pictures)

Saving young lives by the million

Professor Ruth Bishop, 2013 CSL Florey Medallist

By their third birthday, just about every child in the world has had a rotavirus infection. Every day about 1200 children die from it; half a million children every year. That’s changing. We’re fighting back thanks to a discovery made in 1973 by a quiet Melbourne researcher—this year’s winner of the 2013 CSL Florey Medal.

That was when Ruth Bishop, Brian Ruck, Geoffrey Davidson and Ian Holmes at the Royal Children’s Hospital and the University of Melbourne’s microbiology department found a virus, now known as rotavirus. Until the middle of the last decade, it put about 10,000 Australian children in hospital each year with acute gastroenteritis. In the next decade, as a direct result of their research, millions of young lives will be saved.

[click to continue…]

Saving young lives by the million wins national honour for Ruth Bishop

CSL florey web banner

Presentation 8.30pm, Wednesday 30 October, in the Mural Hall, Parliament House, Canberra

HD Australian and international vision available

Saving young lives by the million wins national honour for Ruth Bishop

Because of the rotavirus Ruth Bishop found in Melbourne babies in 1973:

  • 10,000 Australian kids won’t go to hospital this year
  • half a million young lives could  be saved every year as the Gates Foundation and GAVI roll out rotavirus vaccines to the world’s poorest 30 countries by 2015
  • a new Australian rotavirus vaccine is being trialled in New Zealand and Indonesia.

[click to continue…]