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Building a silicon quantum computer chip atom by atom – A University of Melbourne led team have perfected a technique for embedding single atoms in a silicon wafer one-by-one.

Too much heavy metal stops stars producing – Stars are giant factories that produce most of the elements in the Universe, including the elements in us, and in the Earth’s metal deposits. But two papers from ASTRO 3D show that what stars produce changes over time.

Mystery of children’s ‘chalky teeth’ explained: a blood protein blocks hardening of enamel on teeth growing inside the jaw.

Australian and Chilean researchers solve a 100-year-old mystery and call for education and research to save millions of teeth worldwide.

Closing in on the first light in the Universe – Research using new antennas in the Australian hinterland has reduced background noise and brought us closer to finding a 13-billion-year-old signal

Food and housing crisis for Melbourne’s native bees – RMIT researchers call on Melburnians to plant the right plants and create the right homes for native pollinators.

Fishing for solutions to the plastic problem – A University of Adelaide study shows industry players are open to measures to reduce plastics in seafood – but first they have to understand the problem.

Better bone marrow transplants; building a virtual human cell 2021 Metcalf Prizes for Stem Cell Research announced

Securing global net zero: universities have solutions
Zero carbon flight; where should I plant my grapes; VR bushfires and more.

Daniel Watterson and Stephin Vervoort

Faster treatments for future pandemics; investigating the DNA factory in our bodies that makes everything 2022 CSL Centenary Fellowships awarded

‘I saw cancer cells just popping up at me’
Smart microscope slides detect cancer: invented at La Trobe, trialled at Peter Mac, made at ANFF, published in Nature.

29 Health Fellows announced
We were proud to work with the Academy to produce these short video citations of each of the new Fellows (each is about twenty seconds long). They were shown online during the Ceremony and also posted to social media.

A CT brain scanner in an aircraft or ambulance?
Saving lives after stroke with a small aircraft or ambulance-mounted CT brain scanner

One million Aussies affected by eating disorders
Launch of national research strategy

Rover ready for Australian Hospitals
ARTG listing for revolutionary lightweight x-ray machine

Sugar coating opens a path to longer lasting lithium sulfur batteries
Offering the potential to:

  • Drive an electric vehicle from Melbourne to Sydney on a single charge
  • Create lightweight batteries for drones and submarines
  • Unlock new avenues in aviation and maritime industries
  • Produce batteries in Australia with Australian lithium, without using cobalt and rare earth minerals.

Building a silicon quantum computer chip atom by atom

Media releases, Stories for UNSW, The University of Melbourne

An atomic array in silicon paves the way for large scale devices

Video and images: direct link

A University of Melbourne led team have perfected a technique for embedding single atoms in a silicon wafer one-by-one. Their technology offers the potential to make quantum computers using the same methods that have given us cheap and reliable conventional devices containing billions of transistors.

“We could ‘hear’ the electronic click as each atom dropped into one of 10,000 sites in our prototype device. Our vision is to use this technique to build a very, very large-scale quantum device,” says Professor David Jamieson of The University of Melbourne, lead author of the Advanced Materials paper describing the process.

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Too much heavy metal stops stars producing

ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in Three Dimensions (ASTRO-3D), Media releases

Stars evolve according to the elements they manufacture

Stars are giant factories that produce most of the elements in the Universe – including the elements in us, and in the Earth’s metal deposits. But what stars produce changes over time.

Two new papers published in MNRAS shed light on how the youngest generation of stars will eventually stop contributing metals back to the universe.

The authors are all members of ASTRO 3D, the ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions. They are based at Monash University, the Australian National University (ANU), and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

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Mystery of children’s ‘chalky teeth’ explained

D3 Group

A blood protein blocks hardening of enamel on teeth growing inside the jaw

Australian and Chilean researchers solve a 100-year-old mystery and call for education and research to save millions of teeth worldwide.

Case studies available.

One in five children have chalky tooth enamel – visible as discoloured enamel spots – which often causes severe toothache and decay, and sometimes leads to abscesses, extractions and orthodontic problems.

Now, researchers from The D3 Group (based at The University of Melbourne, Australia) and the University of Talca in Chile, have discovered the mechanism causing molar hypomineralisation, the commonest type of chalky teeth.

They report today in Frontiers of Physiology that chalky molars arise when developing enamel is contaminated by albumin – a protein found both in blood and in the tissue fluid surrounding developing teeth. The trigger appears to be childhood illnesses.

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Closing in on the first light in the Universe

ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in Three Dimensions (ASTRO-3D), Media releases

Research using new antennas in the Australian hinterland has reduced background noise and brought us closer to finding a 13-billion-year-old signal

Videos and images: direct link

The early Universe was dark, filled with a hot soup of opaque particles. These condensed to form neutral hydrogen which coalesced to form the first stars in what astronomers call the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR).

“Finding the weak signal of this first light will help us understand how the early stars and galaxies formed,” says Dr Christene Lynch from ASTRO 3D, the ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions.

Dr Lynch is first author on a paper published in Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia. She and her colleagues from Curtin University and the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research have reduced the background noise in their observations allowing them to home in on the elusive signal.

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Food and housing crisis for Melbourne’s native bees

Fresh Science

RMIT researchers call on Melburnians to plant the right plants and create the right homes for native pollinators.
They say we’ll get better tomato crops, more flowers and boost urban biodiversity.

  • Meet RMIT researchers, community gardeners, native bees and wasps
  • South Melbourne BEE Gardens, part of the Heart Gardening Project
  • Corner of Moray and Cobden Streets in South Melbourne

Link for footage from Botanic Gardens and images of native bees

As Melbourne’s gardens burst into life after a wet spring, native insects are out looking for flowers and pollen. City gardeners rely on bees, butterflies and other insects to pollinate their plants, which is how flowering plants reproduce and grow fruit or seeds.

But city gardens often don’t have the right types of food and homes for these helpful native bees and flies, with knock-on effects for our gardens and for biodiversity. Urban ecologist Katherine Berthon from RMIT University found that only 43% of flowers in the Melbourne city gardens she studied were being used by bees and other pollinating insects.

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2021 Metcalf Prizes for Stem Cell Research

Media releases, National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia

More ‘good cells’, safer treatments for leukaemia patients – Siok Tey, Brisbane

Making a virtual human cell to explore how we’re made and how we can regenerate damaged organs – Pengyi Yang, Sydney

WINNERS OF THE NATIONAL STEM CELL FOUNDATION OF AUSTRALIA’S METCALF PRIZES ANNOUNCED TODAY

SCIENTISTS AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEWS:

Research to improve bone marrow transplantation and to use computer science to understand how stem cells work has won two Australian researchers $55,000 each in the annual Metcalf Prizes for Stem Cell Research, awarded by the National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia.

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Securing global net zero: universities have solutions

International Universities Climate Alliance
  • Zero carbon flight is possible, and could be ready by 2030 (Leeds University)
  • Where should I plant my grapes in 2100? (University of Tasmania)
  • Understanding wildfire management with virtual reality projections (Penn State)
  • Floods, droughts, heatwaves, polar vortexes – warming oceans drive extreme weather (University of Bergen)
  • Understanding heat uptake across the Southern Ocean (UNSW Sydney)
  • Open-source solutions for direct carbon capture (NYU)
  • What does ‘net zero’ mean if you don’t have electricity? (University of Southampton)

Speakers available from universities across the world available for interview.

The 50 universities across the world who form the International Universities Climate Alliance are all working on ways we can secure global net zero. The Alliance was established in April 2020 and is convened by the University of New South Wales in Sydney.

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$2.5 million CSL Centenary Fellowships awarded:

CSL Limited

Faster treatments for future pandemics (Brisbane)

Investigating the DNA factory in our bodies that makes everything (Melbourne)

Daniel Watterson and Stephin Vervoort

Two Australian scientists have each been awarded a CSL Centenary Fellowship of $1.25 million over five years to undertake research that will transform our response to pandemics, and lead to new cancer treatments.

The Fellowships were presented at the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences Annual Meeting 2021 on Wednesday 27 October.

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‘I saw cancer cells just popping up at me’

Media releases

On this page:

Smart microscope slides detect cancer:

invented at La Trobe, trialled at Peter Mac, made at ANFF, published in Nature.

A new microscope slide that can be used with any optical microscope may forever change how we identify cancer cells, according to a paper published in Nature today.

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