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Fighting superbugs, life in space, microfactories, and what do Australians really think of science? National Science Week runs from 13 to 21 August. Hundreds of stories around the country. Scientists, experts and event organisers are available for interview.

Visit the National Science Week media centre. See our pick of 2022 highlights state-by-state: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC, WA.

What is your favourite tree? Cast your vote in our national poll – The search is on to find Australia’s favourite tree. The poll opens on Monday 1 August. The list will be cut to the top 20 on Friday 12 August, then 10 finalists on Friday 19 August, and the winner will be announced on Friday August 26.

How do collisions of rocks with planets help the planets evolve? Planetary scientist Katarina Miljkovic is available to discuss the nature of planets in Hobart this week.

Source of ancient Martian rocks found using Perth supercomputer
Now we can sample other planets without leaving home
Published in Nature Communications

Five to ten million years ago an asteroid smashed into Mars. It created a massive crater and propelled a chunk of ancient Martian crust into space as a new meteorite, which eventually crashed into Africa.

We now know where on Mars that meteorite came from, thanks to a supercomputer-powered technology that allows us to explore the geology of planets without leaving home.

First James Webb pictures:

74 per cent of Norway’s new cars are electric. Australia? Just 0.7 percent. Tax tweaks needed to fast-charge EV take up. Buying and running electric vehicles for business fleets is too costly under Aussie tax rules, say researchers from Griffith University and Monash University.

Clinical trial to test potential new combination therapy for aggressive breast cancer – Researchers are recruiting volunteers for a clinical trial they hope will improve survival rates for an aggressive form of breast cancer that affects about 1,500 women each year in New South Wales.

Selfies in ‘space’; sex in the sea; rugby on the Richter scale; and what do scientists think of sci-fi?

National Science Week

ENTERTAINMENT highlights from across Australia this National Science Week

More on these highlights below.

Scientists, performers and event organisers are available for interview leading up to and throughout National Science Week: 13 to 21 August.

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The arresting drama of dementia; Antarctic prophesies; humanity as swarm, and more

National Science Week

Great National Science Week ARTS stories up for grabs now around Australia

Phone scanning art

More on these highlights below.

Scientists, performers and event organisers are available for interview leading up to and throughout National Science Week: 13 to 21 August.

[continue reading…]

How do collisions of rocks with planets help the planets evolve?

Australian Institute of Physics

Planetary scientist Katarina Miljkovic is available to discuss the nature of planets in Hobart this week. It’s part of a national tour of public and school talks promoting opportunities for women in physics. Her free public lecture on Tuesday 9 August is part of National Science Week.

The planets in our solar system are vastly different although they all formed from the same cloud of gas and dust around a star – our sun. Why is this?

Associate Professor Katarina Miljkovic thinks the answers lie in studying how asteroids, comets and meteors bombarded the planets in the past, changing the surface conditions.

She works at Curtin University’s Space Science and Technology Centre and School of Earth and Planetary Sciences and uses data from several NASA missions.

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Sea Country, science on silos, daleks and drones, and Alzheimer’s takes centre stage

National Science Week

Dozens of Science Week stories around South Australia

More on these highlights below.

Scientists, experts and event organisers are available for interview throughout National Science Week.

[continue reading…]

Fighting superbugs, life in space, microfactories, and what do Australians really think of science?

National Science Week

This year’s festival runs from 13 to 21 August, with thousands of events.

National launch with Minister at Parliament House – Thursday 4 August.

Scientists, experts and event organisers are available for interview leading up to and throughout National Science Week. Here are some early stories:

  • National: 88% of Australians trust science and scientists, but scepticism has increased slightly amid social media misinformation – 3M State of Science Index 2022 results reveal what we think of science
  • Canberra: First Nations Sciences of the Land: the official launch of National Science Week at Parliament House
  • Hobart: Dr Karl, a NASA astrobiologist, and 150 roving scientists walk into a science bar…
  • Adelaide: Daleks, racing drones, and dinosaur droppings: Science Alive! is back
  • Melbourne & online: Are you smarter than a TV personality? Charlie Pickering quizzes Nate Byrne, Lawrence Leung and scientists
  • Melbourne: Step inside the International Space Station and take a selfie
  • Perth: What does climate change have to do with human rights?
  • National, with Brisbane talent: 1,500+ rockets simultaneously launched around Australia
  • Darwin: Thunderbirds are go! Why have they gone? Ask a palaeontologist
  • Sydney: Fighting superbugs, big bad tech, caring for sky country, and microfactories making new materials from old – Sydney Science Festival returns.
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What is your favourite tree? Cast your vote in our national poll

ABC projects, National Science Week

Karri, tea tree, river red gum… nationwide project to crown Australia’s most loved species.

The poll opens on Monday 1 August. The list will be cut to the top 20 on Friday 12 August, then 10 finalists on Friday 19 August, and the winner will be announced on Friday August 26.

Images available for media use

Meet the 33 contender trees, and the bottom 15 so far!

Participate at: www.abc.net.au/trees from 1 August.

Mountain ash at Lake Tali Karng
Credit: Claire Gilder

Do you love the water-bulging boab or the towering mountain ash, the world’s tallest flowering tree? Are you intrigued by the carbon capturing power of grey mangrove ecosystems or the ‘living fossil’ story of the Wollemi pine?

The search is on to find Australia’s favourite tree. This National Science Week, ABC Science wants people to go online to explore the wonder and science of the plant kingdom, and vote for their favourite tree.

[continue reading…]

How do collisions of rocks with planets help the planets evolve?

Australian Institute of Physics

Planetary scientist Katarina Miljkovic is available to discuss the nature of planets in Melbourne this week. It’s part of a national tour of public and school talks promoting opportunities for women in physics.

The planets in our solar system are vastly different although they all formed from the same cloud of gas and dust around a star – our sun. Why is this?

Associate Professor Katarina Miljkovic thinks the answers lie in studying how asteroids, comets and meteors bombarded the planets in the past, changing the surface conditions.

She works at Curtin University’s Space Science and Technology Centre and School of Earth and Planetary Sciences and uses data from several NASA missions.

[continue reading…]

Wow, wow, wow. Galaxies collide and tumble in a cosmic dance: Webb reactions

Media releases, Other

Aussie astronomers react to NASA Webb first images.

Media contacts: Niall Byrne, niall@scienceinpublic.com.au, 0417-131-977 or
Jane Watkins, jane@scienceinpublic.com.au, 0425 803 204

Nearly 40 researchers across Australia are eagerly awaiting data from Webb for their projects. Many of them are available to talk on Tuesday about what they hope to see with Webb and about their reaction to the first pictures

[continue reading…]

Source of ancient Martian rocks found using Perth supercomputer

Curtin University, Media releases

Now we can sample other planets without leaving home
Published in Nature Communications

Five to ten million years ago an asteroid smashed into Mars. It created a massive crater and propelled a chunk of ancient Martian crust into space as a new meteorite, which eventually crashed into Africa.

We now know where on Mars that meteorite came from, thanks to a supercomputer-powered technology that allows us to explore the geology of planets without leaving home.

[continue reading…]