National Science Week

swk_stacked_positive_large

National Science Week 2024 will take place from 10 to 18 August.

2.7 million people participated in 1862 registered events and activities for National Science Week 2023 – the largest number of participants in the festival’s history.

See the 2024 national grant winners state-by-state:

————————————————————————————————————–

See our 2023 highlights by category:
Arts, Entertainment, Environment, Family, Indigenous, Women in Science, Youth.

See our 2023 highlights by state:

Or search for stories in your area:
Images are available here:

For more information contact: Tanya Ha on scienceweek@scienceinpublic.com.au, 0404 083 863 or (03) 9398 1416.

Follow Science Week stories on social media via:

You can also get in touch with the state coordinators, sign up for the National Science Week newsletter for news of grant rounds and other information, or visit the Science Week website www.scienceweek.net.au

Martians, dinosaurs headline National Science Week 2024

Media release from The Hon Ed Husic MP, Minister for Industry and Science

12 May 2024

Martians and dinosaurs headline National Science Week 2024, Australia’s biggest annual national celebration of science.

The celebration is now a step closer, with the Australian Government awarding $500,000 in grants to support 32 public science projects right across the country.

The National Science Week Grants provide funding of between $2,000 and $20,000 to support individuals and organisations to deliver community science events.

[continue reading…]

Magpie swoops top spot in poll to find Australia’s Favourite Animal Sound

Did you ‘call it’? Or do the results ruffle your feathers?

The magpie’s warbling has won over the nation, taking out number one in ABC’s search for Australia’s Favourite animal sound. The call of the magpie was a clear winner, attracting over a staggering 36% of the votes in the final round.

“The magpie’s warble is part of almost every soundscape in Australia,” says Dr Dominique Potvin, a behavioural ecologist and senior lecturer in Animal Ecology at the University of the Sunshine Coast. “Its song has regional dialects, developed through learning from older generations. So it’s an ancient song, but it keeps evolving. Magpies come together to sing these melodies in a duet or chorus by family groups, letting others know the territory they occupy,” says Dominique.

[continue reading…]