Ageing answers no longer a hard cell

The holy grail of healthy old age may lie in the riddle of cells that stop Centenary Logocancer and hasten age at the same time.

Professor Judith Campisi, the head of research labs at San Francisco’s Buck Institute for Research on Ageing and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will present this research at the Inflammation in Disease and Ageing conference at Manly, organised by the Centenary Institute.

She has found that senescent cells, which stop cancer in its tracks, also promote the inflammation that drives many age-related problems and chronic diseases.

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Unlimited clean power; sophisticated, target treatment for cancer and more – national physics congress in Sydney

These and more at the national physics congress starting today in Sydney. Read More about Unlimited clean power; sophisticated, target treatment for cancer and more – national physics congress in Sydney

Keeping our best young bioscience brains in Australia: Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize

The winner of the Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize will be announced at 12.30 pm, Thursday 15 November 2012, at a lunch at UBS in Sydney.

He will receive $25,000, and a glass trophy designed by Australian sculptor Nick Mount.

The 2012 finalists are:

  • Robert McLaughlin, a medical engineer from the University of Western Australia (UWA), who has developed an optical probe that fits inside a hypodermic needle and can help surgeons accurately determine the boundaries of breast cancer tumours.
  • Marc Pellegrini, from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI), whose discoveries about how the body regulates its immune system are being applied to clinical trials of cancer vaccines and treatments for HIV and hepatitis.
  • Jian Yang, from the Diamantina Institute at the University of Queensland, who has solved a major puzzle of missing heritability by developing software and methods to determine the multiple genes involved in conditions such as schizophrenia, obesity and diabetes.

New treatments for blood cancers

Dr Kylie Mason Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research/Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Dr Kylie Mason has set herself the goal of developing new ways of treating diseases that are considered incurable. Working as a clinician …

Starving prostate cancer


Prostate cancers are hungry, growing cells. Now we know how to cut off their food supply thanks to research to be published later this month in Cancer Research—work funded by Movember and the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

Researchers at the Centenary Institute in Sydney have discovered a potential future treatment for prostate cancer—through starving the tumour cells of an essential nutrient they need to grow rapidly. Read More about Starving prostate cancer

$25,000 Lawrence Creative Prize awarded for breast cancer research

Posted on behalf of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research

Discovery of the cellular ‘link’ between female hormones and the development of breast cancer has earned Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researcher Dr Marie-Liesse Asselin-Labat the inaugural Lawrence Creative Prize from the Centenary Institute. Read More about $25,000 Lawrence Creative Prize awarded for breast cancer research