Eureka Prizes

No need to shed tears over Australia’s scientific future

  • Why onions make you cry, and how to avoid the tears
  • Why you shouldn’t get your appendix out

These questions were answered by the winning videos for the University of Sydney Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize.

Last night the 2015 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes winners were announced at a gala Award Dinner at Sydney Town Hall, affectionately referred to as the Oscars of Australian science. A total of 16 prizes were given for outstanding contributions to Australian science.

Sponsored by the University of Sydney, the Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize is named in honour of Dr Karl (Kruszelnicki) and Adam Spencer.

The Prize recognises excellence in communicating scientific ideas ‘painlessly’ or, as the Sleek Geeks like to say, “help people to learn something without even noticing.” It rewards the best of hundreds of submitted short films – each communicating a particular scientific concept in an accessible and engaging way.

[click to continue…]

Prize-winning medical research

  • Time to die: killing cells to save lives
  • World’s smallest, brightest nano-flashlights finding a diseased needle in a haystack
  • The much-maligned appendix: not just for grass eaters
  • Making blood on demand with stem cells?

Last night three outstanding medical researchers were among the winners of the 2015 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, announced at a gala Award Dinner at Sydney Town Hall. And an up-and-coming medical researcher won the secondary school prize for unveiling the secrets of the appendix in her video – in which her Nobel Prize-winning grandfather also makes an appearance.

A total of 16 prizes were given for outstanding contributions to Australian science.

Established in 1827, the Australian Museum is the nation’s first museum and one of its foremost scientific research, educational and cultural institutions. The Eureka Prizes are the most comprehensive national science awards, honouring excellence in Research and Innovation, Leadership, Science Communication and Journalism, and School Science.

[click to continue…]

Environmental science recognised

  • Speaking science underwater
  • Vaccines for oysters
  • A global standard for environmental threats, from coral reefs to desert dunes
  • Melting salt to store solar power

Last night four outstanding environmental researchers were among the winners of the 2015 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, announced at a gala Award Dinner at Sydney Town Hall. A total of 16 prizes were given for outstanding contributions to Australian science

Established in 1827, the Australian Museum is the nation’s first museum and one of its foremost scientific research, educational and cultural institutions. The Eureka Prizes are the most comprehensive national science awards, honouring excellence in Research and Innovation, Leadership, Science Communication and Journalism, and School Science.

[click to continue…]

Battlefield communication by mobile, wi-fi and satellites

Defence Science and Technology Group Eureka Prize for Outstanding Science for Safeguarding Australia

  • Winner: Northrop Grumman M5 Network Security

Secure, handheld communication tools developed in Canberra simultaneously use multiple available mobile-phone networks, wi-fi and satellites to ensure the signal never drops out.

Yet despite using these easily accessible public networks, the tools remain secure enough for use by military or intelligence personnel.

For development of the Secure Communications System suite of tools, Northrop Grumman M5 Network Security have been awarded the Defence Science and Technology Group Eureka Prize for Outstanding Science for Safeguarding Australia.

Designed for situations when secure, reliable communications are paramount, the tools are part of a whole suite of secure communication tools.

The lightweight SCS-100 is the smallest of the tools –handheld and easily packed into carry-on luggage, but carrying everything needed for one person’s self-contained, secure communication.

[click to continue…]

Winners of the 2015 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes announced

Salt batteries for renewable energy and vaccines for oysters: Australians rewarded for excellence in science

Last night the 2015 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes winners were announced at a gala Award Dinner at Sydney Town Hall, affectionately referred to as the Oscars of Australian science. A total of 16 prizes were given for outstanding contributions to Australian science, including new prizes for international scientific collaboration and rural innovation.

“It’s an honour to be able to recognise and reward the very best of the valuable, inspiring scientific research being done around the country,” Kim McKay AO, Executive Director and CEO of the Australian Museum said.

“The sponsors and supporters of the Eureka Prizes help us reward excellence in Australian science and I take my hat off to them,” she said. [click to continue…]

Eureka 2015 – winners photos

Pictures of the  Australian Museum 2015 Eureka Prize Winners are available below. Other photographs are also available Getty Images by following this link.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - AUGUST 26:  Dr Phillip Urquijo is presented with the '3M Eureka Prize for Emerging Leader in Science' at the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes 2015 at Sydney Town Hall on August 26, 2015 in Sydney, Australia.  (Photo by Brendon Thorne/Getty Images)

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – AUGUST 26: Dr Phillip Urquijo is presented with the ‘3M Eureka Prize for Emerging Leader in Science’ at the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes 2015 at Sydney Town Hall on August 26, 2015 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Brendon Thorne/Getty Images)

[click to continue…]

Capturing coral’s beauty

New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography

Queensland Museum photographer Gary Cranitch has been awarded the New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography for his image Soft Coral.

coralSoft corals are more diverse and widespread than hard corals, but much less is known about their overall contribution to coral reef biodiversity. About one-third of the world’s soft coral species are found on the Great Barrier Reef, with our limited knowledge of these species an indication of how much we still have to learn. Through his beautiful image, Gary Cranitch highlights this true ‘indicator’ species.

“Gary’s striking image highlights the need to understand the Great Barrier Reef’s often-ignored soft corals” Kim McKay AO, Executive Director and CEO of the Australian Museum said. “I congratulate Gary on being a finalist for the second year in a row and now the winner of this prestigious prize,” she said.

Taking out second place was Murdoch University’s Aileen Elliot with her photograph Thorny-Headed Worm.

Third was Saltwater Crocodile by NSW’s Justin Gilligan. [click to continue…]

Prize-winning Australian science revealed tonight

The best in Australian science discovered tonight Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

2015 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes Award Dinner at Sydney Town Hall

At the end of July, 49 finalists were announced for 16 Eureka Prizes worth a total of $160,000.

Tonight we’ll find out who will take home a coveted Eureka Prize.

To be part of the Eureka Prizes experience, follow us live from the red carpet on Twitter at @EurekaPrizes, and using the #Eureka15 hashtag. We’ll Tweet each winner the moment their names are read out on stage.

Established in 1827, the Australian Museum is the nation’s first museum and one of its foremost scientific research, educational and cultural institutions. The Eureka Prizes are the most comprehensive national science awards, honouring excellence in Research and Innovation, Leadership, Science Communication and Journalism, and School Science.

This year, new prizes recognise excellence in rural research and international collaboration.

For media enquiries please contact the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes media team:

[click to continue…]

Supernovas, synapses and salt-water crocodiles

73 - 4208 - Saltwater Crocodile

Saltwater Crocodile, Justin Gilligan

Ten stunning images from the Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography  – from WA, QLD, SA, ACT, NSW.

 

From the fading tendrils of a long-exploded star to the new connections between nerve cells in our brains: this year’s Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography finalists give glimpses into life at every level.

The three finalist and seven highly commended images will be published publicly on Friday 24, on the Australian Museum and New Scientist websites, and are also available for publication in connection with stories on the Eureka Prizes.

If you need high resolution copies for publication you’ll need a password to access the following link: www.scienceinpublic.com.au/embargoed/high-res-photography-protected

Please drop us an email saying which images you need and why.

[click to continue…]

High-res versions of the Eureka Prize Photographs

High-resolution images from the Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography  – from WA, QLD, SA, ACT, NSW.

You can see the media release and low resolution copies here: www.scienceinpublic.com.au/eureka/finalists-and-highly-commended

But if you need high resolution copies for publication you’ll need a password to access the following link.

www.scienceinpublic.com.au/embargoed/high-res-photography-protected

Please drop us an email saying which images you need and why.

Contact errol@scienceinpublic.com.au or call (03) 9398 1416

Citizen science marches to victory in national science prizes

Two citizen science projects and one project with exciting potential for citizen scientists were among winners of the 2014 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, announced at an Award Dinner held last night at Sydney Town Hall. Fifteen prizes were given for outstanding contributions to Australian science.

The Australian Museum Eureka Prizes are the country’s most comprehensive national science awards. The Eureka Prizes have been rewarding science since 1990—celebrating 25 years in 2014.

For more information about all the winners visit australianmuseum.net.au/eureka. [click to continue…]

Winners of the 2014 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes announced

Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

A $2 smartphone microscope and floaties for choppers: Australians rewarded for excellence in science

Last night the 2014 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes winners were announced at an Award Dinner held at Sydney Town Hall. A total of 15 prizes were given for outstanding contributions to Australian science. With so many fabulous entries it was difficult to pick the winners.

“I’m extremely impressed by the amazing scientific work happening around our country,” Australian Museum Director and CEO Kim McKay said. “I want to extend an enormous thank you to all the sponsors and supporters of the Eureka Prizes for helping us continue to reward excellence in Australian science.”

The Australian Museum Eureka Prizes are the country’s most comprehensive national science awards. The Eurekas have been rewarding science since 1990—celebrating 25 years in 2014.

Full media releases for each prize winner are available at australianmuseum.net.au/eureka.

The 2014 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes: [click to continue…]

Buddhist inspired solar cells and the Eureka Prize winners revealed on Wednesday night

The Face of a Moth

  • Today: a singing prayer bowl has inspired an ANU scientist to re-think the way that solar cells are designed.
  • Today to Wednesday evening: Eureka Prize finalists available for interview.
  • Wednesday night: the 2014 Eureka Prize winners are announced at a grand dinner at Sydney Town Hall.
  • Also revealed on Wednesday: the top science photograph for 2014, available for publication along with all the highly commended photos, including this one: The face of a Moth, by Ralph Grimm.

And finally, a quick thank you to everyone at Radio Australia for your interest in our stories over the years. We were shocked by the scale of the cuts and wish everyone leaving the best. Our friends in CSIRO have also taken big cuts including some 40 communication jobs.  [click to continue…]

Finalists for the 25th edition of the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes

Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

Forty-four entries have been selected as finalists for the 15 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes worth a total of $150,000 in prize money. The finalists are from Western Australia, South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania, ACT, Victoria and New South Wales.

The achievements of the 2014 Eureka Prize finalists are inspirational and vitally important for Australia,” Kim McKay AO, director and CEO of the Australian Museum said. “The finalists’ inventions and research will save lives, safeguard our environment for the future, and ensure the viability of Australian industry.”

The Australian Museum Eureka Prizes are the country’s most comprehensive national science awards, honouring excellence in Research and Innovation, Leadership, Science Communication and Journalism, and School Science. 2014 is the 25th edition of the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes. They were first awarded in 1990.

[click to continue…]

Face to face with moths and manta rays

Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography highly commended and finalists announced – from Western Australia, Queensland, Victoria, ACT and New South Wales.

Three finalists and seven highly commended images have been selected for the 2014 Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography.

The images bring you face to face with manta rays, moths and the crown-of-thorns starfish, and even closer to microscopic flowerbuds and human tissue wreathed by nanoparticles. They will be published today on the Australian Museum and New Scientist websites, and are also available for publication.

[click to continue…]

Captions-2014 Australian Museum Eureka Prize for Science Photography

Wednesday 10-September: The first, second and third place winners will be announced at the Award Dinner and that information will be embargoed until the time of announcement in the course of the dinner. The winner themselves won’t know until it’s announced on stage.

Press release and high resolution copies available online at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/eureka.

Password available from

[click to continue…]