Share

Are you or your researchers keen to speak up for science? Now more than ever we need to hear stories of science, how science has made an impact and changed our lives. We need to see and hear from passionate researchers who are making a difference.

In this bulletin I’m focussing on training, prizes and showcasing science.

Read the full article →

Share

It’s been a pretty exciting time for EMBL Australia lately, with international visitors, new group leaders, and even a Nature paper.

But the one thing which really stood out for me in the past year was our EMBL Australia PhD Course.

At last year’s course at WEHI in Melbourne, we spent two weeks with 60 passionate and enthusiastic PhD students.

Not only did the students learn the tools of the trade from top researchers, they also formed an invaluable network of peers, who will hold their own student-run symposium in Sydney later this year.

This year we’ll bring together another 60 PhD students at ANU in Canberra. Applications are open now – read on for more details.

Read the full article →

Share

Posted on behalf of Samantha Hass (Head of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, L’Oréal Australia & New Zealand)

L’Oréal’s global For Women in Science program is in full swing for 2014.

In Australia and New Zealand we’re in the final stages of applications for our three $AU25,000 Fellowships. Please encourage your best early career researchers to apply by 16 April.

The Paris Spring has brought a fresh crop of Laureates, exceptional women, scientific leaders from the five regions of the world.

Read the full article →

Share

A team from Melbourne, Monash, UQ and the synchrotron (including core members of the ARC Imaging Centre team) have found what sends our MAITs into action to protect our gut from invaders.

The patented work is the starting point to understanding our first line of defence, and what happens when it goes wrong.  It will lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcers and even TB.

Contact Niall on niall@scienceinpublic.com.au to get in touch with the team.

Share

This morning Monash, Melbourne, and UQ have a cracking paper in Nature announcing the discovery of a key that wakes up a poorly understood part of our immune system.

It’s the next step for the research which last year won the Eureka Prize for Scientific Research.

Two years ago they discovered that ‘mystery’ immune cells in our gut detect invaders by reacting to components of vitamin B that are only made by certain bacteria and fungi. Now they have a molecular key to turn this off and on.
Read the full article →

Share

Melbourne, Monash, UQ and the synchrotron find what sends our MAITs into action to protect our gut from invaders.

T-cell-activation-by-transitory-antigens_smallOur guts, lungs and mouths are lined with mysterious immune cells that make up to ten per cent of the T cells in our immune system. Last year Australian researchers showed that these cells act as sentinels against invading bacteria and fungi. Now they’ve identified the precise biochemical key that wakes up these sentries and sends them into action.
Share