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By blocking a widespread enzyme, Centenary researchers have shown they can slow down the movement of cells and potentially stop tumours from spreading and growing.

Using a new super-resolution microscope they’ve been able to see single molecules of the enzyme at work in a liver cancer cell line. Then they’ve used confocal microscopes to see how disrupting the enzyme slows the cells down in living cancer cells.

The enzyme is DPP9 (dipeptidyl peptidase 9) which the researchers at the Centenary Institute and the Sydney Medical School were first to discover and clone, in 1999. Ever since they’ve been studying what it does, with a view to its possible use as a cancer drug target.

“It was exciting to be able to watch the enzyme at work and then block DPP9, and see the cells slow down,” says A/Prof Mark Gorrell from Centenary’s Molecular Hepatology unit. “This gives us our clearest evidence yet that this enzyme will be a good cancer drug target.”

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  • Picking endangered parrots out from the dawn chorus
  • Could maths and science have shortened WW1?
  • Lawrence Krauss
  • Nobel-winning photon-juggler replaces Schrödinger’s cat

These topics and more on the final day of the national physics conference, Thursday 11 December Read the full article →

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Good science happens when clever people ask insightful questions. Some papers at the national physics congress in Canberra last week took on their colleagues—asking penetrating questions of mainstream science. Read the full article →

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Victorian government supports plans to build a dark matter laboratory deep in Stawell Gold Mine.

The Victorian government has committed $1.75 million to help Australian scientists hunt for dark matter a kilometre underground in the Stawell gold mine in regional Victoria. The project will commence once the Federal government provides matching support from their regional development program.

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Physicists recognised this week at the national physics congress in Canberra have won recognition for:

  • Using lasers to safeguard future communications
  • Replacing Schrödinger’s famous ‘cat in a box’ with photons and mirrors
  • Engaging students by changing the way we usually teach science
  • Bending light for nanoscale photonics and light-driven computing

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  • Football physics tackles hamstring injuries
  • Finding airports 50 light years away
  • A sun on earth- fact or fiction
  • Laser tracking of carbon-coughing cattle
  • A Victorian goldfields search for galactic dark matter

These topics and more on day three of the national physics conference, Wednesday 10 December Read the full article →

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