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Press release from Springer Nature

Group of Eight jostle for high-quality scientific research leadership in Australia

Australia is placed 12th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the Nature Index Tables released together today.

Australia is just ahead of India and three places behind South Korea. The US leads the index, followed by China, Germany, the UK and Japan.

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Press release from Springer Nature

The US is the world’s largest contributor to high-quality scientific research papers, followed by China and Germany, according to the Nature Index 2016 Tables. Of the top ten countries in the Nature Index, only China has shown double-digit compound annual growth between 2012 and 2015 with some of its universities growing their contribution to the index as fast as 25% annually. US contributions have declined 2.8% in the same period from a very high base.

The Nature Index Tables, which show Nature Index calendar year outputs for the last four years, are released together today for the first time. The Nature Index is built on a country or institution’s contribution to about 60,000 high-quality papers each year, and counts both the total number of papers and the relative contribution to each paper. (See notes for editors for full definitions of measures.)

Harvard University, US, has the highest 2015 contribution of any university in the world. Stanford University (second), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (fourth), University of California, Berkeley (seventh), University of California, San Diego (ninth) and University of Michigan (tenth) — all from the US — occupy top ten positions. The University of Tokyo, Japan, is placed third, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, UK, are fifth and sixth, respectively, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, is placed eighth.

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Press release from Springer Nature

Otago at 303 in global index of thousands of universities, ahead of Auckland at 386

New Zealand is 30th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the Nature Index Tables released together today. That puts it just behind Ireland, but ahead of Saudi Arabia, Chile, and Argentina.

The US remains the world’s largest contributor to high-quality scientific research papers, followed by China and Germany, according to the Nature Index 2016 Tables. Australia is 12th.

The University of Otago is New Zealand’s leading research university in the index, placed 303 in the world ahead of the University of Auckland at 386.

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Press release from Springer Nature

NTU at 32 in global index of universities with NUS at 40 

Singapore is 17th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the 2016 Nature Index Tables released together today. That puts it behind Australia (in 12th place) but in front of Taiwan (18) and Russia (19).

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) appears as Singapore’s leading research university in the index, placed 32 in the world among universities ahead of National University of Singapore (NUS) at 40. Both are well in front of Seoul National University and of Australia’s top universities.

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Enabled by the Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology opening 20 April 2016 at The University of Sydney

Supporting information

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World TB Day on March 24 reminds us of the growing TB threat

Scientists available for interview in English and Bahasa Indonesia for World TB Day. Read the release in Bahasa Indonesia.
More images below.

Better vaccines are needed for the global fight against tuberculosis (TB). The Global Fund reports an estimated nine million new cases globally per year of TB, which is second only to AIDS as the world’s most deadly infectious disease. Indonesia had more than 320,000 reported cases in 2014 according to the World Health Organization, while Australia’s reported cases were just over 1,000. But the rise of drug-resistant TB poses a threat to all countries.

Two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium have shown promising results in investigations in mice for a new vaccine. Scientists from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney, with colleagues at Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) in Yogyakarta, have found that the injected proteins can prime the immune system to induce protection against TB in mice.

The team has established a laboratory and immunological techniques to test if the two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium can be used as the basis for a vaccine. Credit: Centenary Institute

The team has established a laboratory and immunological techniques to test if the two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium can be used as the basis for a vaccine. Credit: Centenary Institute

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