This week at Science in Public

This Week

National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia

National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia

The National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia supports stem cell science and educates the community about the potential and dangers of stem cell therapies.

The winners of the 2016 Metcalf Prizes for Stem Cell Research will be announced on Sunday 24 July.

Media release and profiles below.

The winners will receive their awards at a breakfast ceremony on Wednesday 27 July in Melbourne. Visit the website: stemcellfoundation.net.au

2016 Metcalf Prizes – Melbourne

National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia

Making cancer treatment less aggressive and more effective

On embargo until 12.01 am 24 July 2016

Tracy Heng wants to make cancer treatment gentler and more effective for elderly patients with blood cancer and other blood disorders.

“Bone marrow transplants have transformed survival rates for blood cancers. They replace a diseased blood system with healthy blood-forming cells, but first, doctors have to wipe out a patient’s immune system, which takes a big toll on elderly patients. My goal is to change that,” says Tracy. [click to continue…]

Tracy Heng: making cancer treatment less aggressive, more effective

2016 Metcalf Prizes – Sydney

National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia

Stem cells healing broken hearts

On embargo until 12.01 am 24 July 2016

James Chong has two starters in the race to develop stem cell therapies for heart failure as viable alternatives to heart transplants. His research is exploring both the potential for transplanted stem cells to regenerate new heart tissue and how to repair a patient’s heart by rejuvenating their own heart stem cells.

“In Australia, 54,000 people suffer a heart attack and 20,000 die from chronic heart failure each year. I want to develop stem cell treatments that can save the lives of the thousands of people who miss out on heart transplants,” says James. [click to continue…]

James Chong, stem cells healing broken hearts, credit The Westmead Institute, Sydney

2016 Metcalf Prizes – Media release

Media releases, National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia

Stem cells healing broken hearts – James Chong, Sydney 

Making cancer treatment less aggressive, more effective –Tracy Heng, Melbourne

Winners of the National Stem Cell Foundation of Australia’s Metcalf Prizes announced

On embargo until 12.01am Sunday 24 July 2016

Scientists available for interviews

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Tell us about Indonesia; new million dollar fellowships; meet our Freshies in Brisbane and Sydney; media training; and more

Bulletins, Science stakeholder bulletins

Indonesia: we’re writing a collection of short innovation stories for the Australia-Indonesia Centre and our brief isn’t restricted to work funded by the Centre. So if you know of any examples of collaborative research between Indonesia and Australia, please let me know.

This is a collection that we hope will be useful to government, business, science and cultural leaders, and that will contribute to a better understanding between our two nations. [click to continue…]

Women in Science: from coral to defence, synthetic biology to memory

Other

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Tens of thousands of Australian lives changed, over three million to go

Blamey Saunders hears, Media releases

National science prize for Melbourne hearing aid revolutionary Elaine Saunders

Four million Australians, young and old, need a hearing blamey_saunders_logoaid. Without one they’re at risk of losing their friends, their partner, their job and their sanity. But price, stigma and the loss of control when we see an audiologist are amongst the factors that stop most people from acting.

Elaine Saunders has changed that for tens of thousands of Australians.  [click to continue…]

The Incus in use. Image: Blamey Saunders hears.

(ATSE media release) Innovation and a thick skin wins out for top science award

Blamey Saunders hears, Media releases

Embargo 6pm Wednesday 15 June

Hearing aids are not all the same, despite claims to the contrary, and price is no longer a good indicator of quality.

This is a message from Dr Elaine Saunders, who is today set to receive Australia’s top honour for our leading visionaries, a prestigious ATSE Clunies Ross Award in the Entrepreneur of the Year Category. The award recognises her successful disruption of hearing service provision in Australia. Dr Saunders has made premium hearing aids more accessible by challenging business and pricing models.

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Backgrounder

Blamey Saunders hears, Media releases

Elaine Saunders wins Clunies Ross Award

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$730 million Next Generation Tech Fund; inside Melbourne’s secret defence labs; using Science Week; media training; and more

Bulletins, Science stakeholder bulletins

Defence Science and Technology Group needs you. They’re managing a $730 million Next Generation Technology Program to build collaboration with industry and academia.

This week they’re opening their ‘secret’ labs in Melbourne to media, industry and their academic partners. Some of the stories they’re revealing include:

  • Adding years to the life of Australia’s F/A-18 Hornet fighters
  • Testing acoustic tiles for Australia’s stealth submarines – present and future
  • Running Australia’s most flexible Defence flight simulator
  • Finding out if body armour can be worn in the jungle – with the help of a sweating mannequin
  • Working to make a Bushmaster truck disappear
  • Turning donuts into jet fuel
  • And more below

Communication training and delivery for your science team

We’ve got media and communication training courses in:

  • Melbourne: Tuesday 21 June, Thursday 21 July
  • Sydney: Thursday 7 July
  • Canberra: Wednesday 29 June
  • Adelaide: Thursday 4 August
  • Perth: Wednesday 14 September

Or book a bespoke course for your team and develop your own science communication plan.

We also offer communication planning, web design, photography and social media. And we can help you get media coverage for your conference.

More below.

National Science Week – are you in?

Last year, 1.3 million people participated in over 1,500 activities during National Science Week. It’s a catalyst that makes it easy for anyone to hold a successful event.

So how will you use Science Week to celebrate your science this year? It’s from 13-21 August.

Highlights of the program so far include Steve Wozniak and Brian Cox touring the country, a national innovation summit, and Wildlife Spotter – the national experiment.

More below.

Kind regards,
Niall
In this bulletin:

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Supporting Defence Science and Technology

Showcasing innovative defence technologies

Media releases

The Defence Science and Technology Group (DST) is staging open days at its Melbourne laboratory for industry and academia to showcase innovative technologies being developed to give the Australian Defence Force a capability edge.

The Partnerships Week event (6 to 10 June) is part of DST’s outreach campaign for closer ties with companies, universities and public research organisations to undertake collaborative research projects for Defence capability.

Chief Defence Scientist, Dr Alex Zelinsky, said Partnerships Week was based on the successful event held in Adelaide last year.

“Our industry and university partners have said they value the interaction with our scientists and the opportunity to get involved with the specialist work we do for Australia’s defence and national security,” he said.

The event includes site tours, technology demonstrations, research capability displays, and access to Defence researchers to discuss new and emerging capabilities. [click to continue…]

Inside the ‘secret’ Defence Science and Technology Group laboratories

Media releases

You’re invited to take a look inside the ‘secret’ Defence Science and Technology Group laboratories in Fishermans Bend tomorrow and Thursday.

Access will be tightly controlled so it will take a bit of planning. This isn’t your regular media call where you can just turn up. This is Defence…. there will be forms, you’ll need ID, serial numbers of your kit and other complications.

But we have stories for your consideration: some for now, some for later. [click to continue…]

Backing up your sci comm team; new prizes; and Canberra changes

Bulletins, Science stakeholder bulletins

We’re expanding our services to support science and science communication teams in universities and research institutes.

We can help for example:

  • If you’ve got a big story that needs an extra national or international push.
  • If you need a strategy for a project or centre.
  • If your team needs coaching for an ARC interview, or media training.
  • If you want mentoring to grow your public profile.

Prices start from $800 for media training.

More below.

Prizes open now

  • $80,000 GSK Award for excellence in medical research – open till 4 July
  • Two $1.25million CSL Centenary Fellowships for mid-career medical researchers – closing 31 July
  • $25,000 2016 CSL Young Florey Medal for medical research – open till this Monday, 6 June
  • veski innovation fellowships of up to $150,000 – bringing international talent home to Melbourne, closing 14 July
  • Two $50,000 Victoria Prizes – for life sciences and physical sciences, closing 23 June.

More below.

Changes in science advocacy

Catriona Jackson is leaving Science and Technology Australia. She’s done a fantastic job advocating for science in the tough Abbott era. But she’s not going far – to Universities Australia as their deputy CEO.

Kylie Walker will take her place, moving from her role as communication director at the Academy of Science. The Academy CEO Sue Meek is also moving on, as is Peter Thomas who drove the SAGE gender equity initiative. He’s going to AAMRI, the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes.

Sue and Kylie have transformed the public and political impact of the Academy.

My thanks to Stephen Machett’s Campus Morning Mail for the heads-up.

Fresh Science

Fifty young researchers from 30 organisations are performing around the country this month and next.

Thank you to the 17 universities, four museums, and other groups who have partnered with us to deliver Fresh Science 2016.

Now you can see your early-career researchers taking the next step – engaging with the community, media, government and industry around the country. There are still free tickets left for the pub nights in Adelaide (15 June), Brisbane (18 July) and Sydney (26 July) and school forums in Perth (8 June) and Sydney (26 July).

Media and communication training

We’re running courses in:

  • Melbourne: Tuesday 21 June, Thursday 21 July, Tuesday 6 September, Thursday 27 October, Tuesday 13 December
  • Sydney: Thursday 7 July, Friday 2 September, Tuesday 15 November
  • Canberra: Wednesday 29 June
  • Adelaide: Thursday 4 August
  • Perth: Wednesday 14 September

More below, or you can register now via Eventbrite.

In this bulletin 

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UQ number one in science says Nature Index, and Microsoft’s Station Q settles at Sydney Nanoscience Hub

Media bulletins

Australia was number 12 in high-quality global research in 2015 according to the Nature Index released overnight in London.

The Group of Eight universities jostle again for the top eight places in Australia, with UQ on top, followed by Monash, ANU, and Melbourne.

Australia is just ahead of India and three places behind South Korea. The US leads the index, followed by China, Germany, the UK and Japan.

Globally, Harvard University is the leading university followed by Stanford University, The University of Tokyo and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Media release below and see all the details at www.natureindex.com/annual-tables/2016.

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Nature’s take on Australian science – Index released overnight

Science stakeholder bulletins

UQ on top, followed by Monash, but Melbourne more collaborative, and Curtin the fastest riser in today’s Nature Index.

The latest Nature Index published overnight in London reveals Australia’s contribution to high-quality scientific research.

The University of Queensland takes out the top spot in Australia (at 89 on the global university list) with the other members of the Group of Eight filling out the top eight positions in Australia.

Monash University is 93 globally, the Australian National University is at 100, and The University of Melbourne at 130. Australia has eleven universities in the top 500 institutions in the Index which tracks over 8,000 institutions worldwide.

CSIRO is the highest placed non-university body on the Index.

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Australia is number 12 in high quality global research in Nature Index

Media releases, Nature

Press release from Springer Nature

Group of Eight jostle for high-quality scientific research leadership in Australia

Australia is placed 12th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the Nature Index Tables released together today.

Australia is just ahead of India and three places behind South Korea. The US leads the index, followed by China, Germany, the UK and Japan.

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Movers and shakers in the world of high-quality scientific research

Media releases, Nature

Press release from Springer Nature

The US is the world’s largest contributor to high-quality scientific research papers, followed by China and Germany, according to the Nature Index 2016 Tables. Of the top ten countries in the Nature Index, only China has shown double-digit compound annual growth between 2012 and 2015 with some of its universities growing their contribution to the index as fast as 25% annually. US contributions have declined 2.8% in the same period from a very high base.

The Nature Index Tables, which show Nature Index calendar year outputs for the last four years, are released together today for the first time. The Nature Index is built on a country or institution’s contribution to about 60,000 high-quality papers each year, and counts both the total number of papers and the relative contribution to each paper. (See notes for editors for full definitions of measures.)

Harvard University, US, has the highest 2015 contribution of any university in the world. Stanford University (second), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (fourth), University of California, Berkeley (seventh), University of California, San Diego (ninth) and University of Michigan (tenth) — all from the US — occupy top ten positions. The University of Tokyo, Japan, is placed third, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, UK, are fifth and sixth, respectively, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, is placed eighth.

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University of Otago is New Zealand’s top high quality research contributor in the Nature Index

Media releases, Nature

Press release from Springer Nature

Otago at 303 in global index of thousands of universities, ahead of Auckland at 386

New Zealand is 30th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the Nature Index Tables released together today. That puts it just behind Ireland, but ahead of Saudi Arabia, Chile, and Argentina.

The US remains the world’s largest contributor to high-quality scientific research papers, followed by China and Germany, according to the Nature Index 2016 Tables. Australia is 12th.

The University of Otago is New Zealand’s leading research university in the index, placed 303 in the world ahead of the University of Auckland at 386.

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Singapore: a regional research power in Nature Index

Media releases, Nature

Press release from Springer Nature

NTU at 32 in global index of universities with NUS at 40 

Singapore is 17th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the 2016 Nature Index Tables released together today. That puts it behind Australia (in 12th place) but in front of Taiwan (18) and Russia (19).

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) appears as Singapore’s leading research university in the index, placed 32 in the world among universities ahead of National University of Singapore (NUS) at 40. Both are well in front of Seoul National University and of Australia’s top universities.

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