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national-stem-cell-foundation-of-australiaAusSMC briefing 11 am Melbourne Convention Centre and online at: www.aussmc.org.au

Free public forums and media interviews in Sydney (25 August), Brisbane
(26 August), Adelaide (28 August), and Melbourne (1 September).

When will stem cell medicine deliver on its promise for:

  • Cancer
  • Brain diseases and spinal cord injury
  • Repairing organs and tissue.

What’s holding us back after the years of hype?

Why you shouldn’t pursue unproven stem cell treatments?

 

Free public forums and media interviews in Sydney (25 August), Brisbane (26 August), Adelaide (28 August), and Melbourne (1 September).

Professor Irv Weissman and Dr Ann Tsukamoto discovered human blood stem cells in 1992 and have experienced all of the joy and frustration of researching developing stem cell medicines.

Today they’re trialling treatments for cancer and for degenerative diseases. But they’re also deeply concerned about the over promising of stem cell medicine, and of the unproven treatments that cost desperate patients tens of thousands of dollars.

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Media call: 11am, 17 August 2014 with researchers and dogs at The University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital, NSW Lydia Tong Credit OK-White Lane

Pet abuse and domestic violence are closely linked. Animals can’t talk but University of Sydney vet Dr Lydia Tong has shown vets how to tell the difference between bone fractures caused by accidents and those caused by abuse. Her fracture identification methods are giving vets the added confidence to identify cases of violence against pets and could serve as a warning of domestic violence.

Now, in a new study with Domestic Violence NSW, Lydia is looking deeper into the connections between animal abuse and domestic violence to assess the need for better services to protect both human and animal victims.

“Around 70% of women escaping violent homes also report pet abuse,” says Lydia. “So vets are often the first to see evidence of abuse in a family, when they treat injured pets.”

“Different forces on bones can tell a story—the skeleton of an animal keeps a distinct record that indicates the force applied to bones from past injuries, breaks or fractures. But it can often be difficult for vets to say with confidence whether a fracture has resulted from abuse or accident.”

To give vets this confidence, in a 2014 study, Lydia collected cases of abused dogs who were punched, hit with a blunt weapon or kicked, and examined the fractures from these injuries. She then compared these fractures to those caused by genuine accidents. Her results, published in The Veterinary Journal, identified five key features of fractures that vets could look for to distinguish accidents from abuse.

Now, having given vets this reference to diagnose abuse, Lydia and her colleagues at The University of Sydney are gathering more information on the connections between domestic violence and animal abuse. Read the full article →

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Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

Forty-four entries have been selected as finalists for the 15 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes worth a total of $150,000 in prize money. The finalists are from Western Australia, South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania, ACT, Victoria and New South Wales.

The achievements of the 2014 Eureka Prize finalists are inspirational and vitally important for Australia,” Kim McKay AO, director and CEO of the Australian Museum said. “The finalists’ inventions and research will save lives, safeguard our environment for the future, and ensure the viability of Australian industry.”

The Australian Museum Eureka Prizes are the country’s most comprehensive national science awards, honouring excellence in Research and Innovation, Leadership, Science Communication and Journalism, and School Science. 2014 is the 25th edition of the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes. They were first awarded in 1990.

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Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography highly commended and finalists announced – from Western Australia, Queensland, Victoria, ACT and New South Wales.

Three finalists and seven highly commended images have been selected for the 2014 Australian Museum New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography.

The images bring you face to face with manta rays, moths and the crown-of-thorns starfish, and even closer to microscopic flowerbuds and human tissue wreathed by nanoparticles. They will be published today on the Australian Museum and New Scientist websites, and are also available for publication.

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Wednesday 10-September: The first, second and third place winners will be announced at the Award Dinner and that information will be embargoed until the time of announcement in the course of the dinner. The winner themselves won’t know until it’s announced on stage.

Press release and high resolution copies available online at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/eureka.

Password available from

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Aus Musuem Eureka Prizes logo

 

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Eureka Prize for Environmental Research

  • Professor Graham Edgar and Dr Rick Stuart-Smith, University of Tasmania
  • The IUCN Red List of Ecosystems Team, University of New South Wales
  • The Mallee Fire and Biodiversity Project Team, La Trobe University and Deakin University (Melbourne)

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