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Coral trout in protected ‘green zones’ are not only bigger and more abundant than those in fished ‘blue zones’ of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, but they are also better able to cope with cyclone damage, according to a long-term study published today in Current Biology.

Coral trout biomass has more than doubled since the 1980s in the green zones with most of the growth occurring since the 2004 rezoning. These and other changes identified by the study show that the green zones are contributing to the health of the Great Barrier Reef and that similar approaches may be beneficial for coral reefs around the world.

Video: Michelle Jonker © AIMS

The joint project between the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University combined a vast amount of information from underwater surveys carried out from 1983-2012, on reefs spread across approximately 150,000 km2 (more than 40 per cent) of the Marine Park.

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In 2014, The British Council and Fresh Science joined forces to bring FameLab to Australia. This year FameLab and Fresh Science will be independent events.

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Made in Melbourne and on display at the Avalon International Airshow

Opening new manufacturing opportunities for Australia in aerospace, medicine and light industry

Media call 11 am Thursday 26 February at the Victorian Government Stand, Hall 2, Avalon International Airshow. HD overlay of the printers at work also available.

Monash University researchers along with collaborators from CSIRO and Deakin University have printed a jet engine. In fact Monash and their spin-out company Amaero, have printed two engines. One is on display this week at the International Air Show in Avalon, while the second is displayed in Toulouse at the French aerospace company Microturbo (Safran).

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Nominations for the 2015 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science now open, closing 26 March

NEW AWARD TO RECOGNISE SUCCESS IN SCIENCE

The Australian Government will recognise the practical and commercial successes of Australian scientists, with a new award to be added to the 2015 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science. Read the full article →

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How we punch our way into cancer cells

Full media release, media contacts, photos, videos and background information below.  

Full paper here

The pore-forming pleurotolysin proteins

The pore-forming pleurotolysin proteins

Edible oyster mushrooms have an intriguing secret: they eat spiders and roundworms. And they do so using proteins which can punch their way into cells, leaving tidy but deadly holes. It’s a trick that our immune cells also use to protect us; destroying infected cells, cancerous cells, and bacteria.

Research published today in PLOS Biology by an international team, led by the ARC Imaging Centre at Monash University and Birkbeck College, in London, reveals the molecular process behind the punch. Read the full article →

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Launch of the $20 million Clive and Vera Ramaciotti Centre for Structural Cryo Electron Microscopy

  • Monash University, Melbourne
  • 11 am Monday 2 February 2015

 With Prof Aidan Byrne, CEO of the Australian Research Council; Prof Edwina Cornish, Provost and Senior Vice-President, Monash University; and Caitriona Fay, National Manager Philanthropy, Perpetual.

A unique $5 million electron microscope launched today at Monash University, Melbourne, will transform the way we view the human immune system, and advance Australian research towards better treatment for diseases from cancer and malaria to diabetes, rheumatism and multiple sclerosis.

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