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Frozen fossils, superbugs, humans 2.0, and the Ultimate Drone Challenge

Today: Highlights from day five of National Science Week

422 events and exhibitions, 22 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

Sydney

  • Bob Brown’s battle for the planet, from the Franklin River to Federal Parliament
  • Will coral reefs survive climate change? Ask the scientists
  • Superbugs: what we need to do to become resistance fighters

Melbourne

  • Humans 2.0: what’s the future look like for humanity?

Toowoomba

  • The world’s most powerful laser. Meet Ceri Brenner, the UK physicist pressing FIRE

Canberra

  • Frozen fossils: palaeontologist reveals unseen footage of 1970 Antarctic Fossil Expedition

Darwin

  • Drone enthusiasts compete for a place in the Ultimate Drone Challenge finals

Adelaide

  • Young scientists with healthy advice for senior Australians

Perth

  • The science, songs and stories of the night sky and Indigenous astronomy.

Read on for more on these, including event contact details.
Also today:

More than 2,000 events and activities are registered throughout Australia—from Corals in the Outback in Queensland, to events at our Antarctic bases, and from STEM meets dance in Perth to The Innovation Games at Sydney Olympic Park—with everything from science festivals, music and comedy shows, expert panel discussions, interactive hands-on displays, open days and online activities.

National Science Week runs until 19 August. Media kit at www.scienceinpublic.com.au. Or visit the National Science Week website for the details of events in your area: www.scienceweek.net.au.

For general Science Week media enquiries:

Tanya Ha: tanya@scienceinpublic.com.au or 0404 083 863
Niall Byrne: niall@scienceinpublic.com.au or 0417 131 977

Have you missed our highlights for specialist rounds?

Here they are for The Arts, Environment, Indigenous and Health reporters.

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Merlot-making microbes, health tech, hangry, and fifty shades of cray

Today: Highlights from day four of National Science Week

347 events and exhibitions, 20 online activities, and dozens of great stories and talent.

Adelaide

  • How do microbes turn grape juice into wine?
  • The secrets of the success of giant cuttlefish in the waters near Whyalla

Canberra

  • How are mobile devices and apps affecting our mental health and how can they be used as a force for good?
  • How will climate change affect whisky?

Albany

  • Fifty shades of cray: what does a male fiddler crab do with his enlarged claw?

Sydney

  • Quantum computing making problem-solving take minutes instead of years—Michelle Simmons
  • Stargazing over wine with Fred Watson

Melbourne

  • Hangry? How hunger affects your behaviour
  • How will apps, mobiles and sensors change healthcare? Harvard professor in Melbourne

Darwin

  • Pulse check for politicians at Parliament House

Read on for more on these, including event contact details.

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Laser power, Frankenstein, whisky science, and more

Today

National Science Week state launch events in:

  • 10am in Launceston with the Minister getting experimental at QVMAG
  • 11.30am in Canberra with the announcement of the ACT Scientist of the Year, at Kingston Bus Depot
  • 5.30pm in Melbourne with the Lead Scientist, and the volcanic roots of Frankenstein
  • 6pm in Darwin with dramatic weather at Brown’s Mart Theatre
  • 7pm in Adelaide with astrophysics and the announcement of the Science Excellence Award winners at the Adelaide Convention Centre.

More below.

Plus, dozens of MPs and senators will join CSIRO Scientists in Schools to launch Science Week locally in their electorates or regions.

See our state highlights for New South WalesQueensland and Western Australia.

We’ll have daily highlights each day of the Science Week’s nine-day ‘week’ at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/science-week and on Twitter at @SciWKMedia.

Scientists and event organisers are available for interview throughout the week – contact Tanya Ha on tanya@scienceinpublic.com.au, 0404 083 863 or (03) 9398 1416.
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The future of scholarly books; expensive pee; National Science Week; pitch training

Explore the future of scholarly monographs with Springer Nature’s Chief Book Strategist at a forum hosted by ANU this Tuesday 31 July. More on that below.

Make sure your National Science Week events are registered so we can promote them. It kicks off 11 August. Read on for some of the highlights amongst the 2000+ events.

How can researchers and policy makers work better together – we want your views for an ANU research project.

Meet the people who put science in front of billions of people, this November in Brisbane.

Vitamania – health revolution of expensive pee – on SBS and around the country.

Pitch and communication training courses in Perth, Sydney, Adelaide and Melbourne.

And

  • Are you, or do you know someone in stem cell research? If so, nominate them today for a Metcalf Prize worth $50,000.
  • CSL Centenary Fellowships are also open, worth $1.25m for two early to mid-career Australian biomedical researchers.

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Creating future TV stars of science; $1.25 million CSL Fellowships for medical researchers; $50,000 stem cell prizes; training

Could your research stories engage billions of viewers through science and factual TV?

The people who create, fund and broadcast science TV will be meeting in Brisbane in November at the World Congress of Science and Factual Producers.

They deliver big audiences. Discovery Channel alone has over 440 million viewers. Animal Planet has over 350 million. China Central Television has 50 channels and a billion viewers.

We helped bring Congress to Melbourne in 2009. After nearly 10 years it’s back, this time in Brisbane thanks to the support of the Queensland Government, the ABC and SBS.

Last year’s Congress included commissioners and producers from the BBC, Netflix, NHK, PBS, Discovery, Canada’s CBC and dozens of other networks from national broadcasters to cult YouTube channels.

How can you reach this community? The options include:

  • presenting your researchers via exhibition booths
  • holding your own presentations or group meetings at breakfast and lunch events
  • hosting post-Congress tours
  • supporting Australian researchers who are potential TV stars of the future
    supporting producers from emerging countries
  • and the usual range of sponsorships.

Read more about the Congress at: https://www.wcsfp.com/

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Manufacturing a cell therapy peace-keeping force, and more

Today

It’s Day 3 of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) 2018 Annual Meeting at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre: more than 2,500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries will hear from 150+ speakers, including:

Lab-grown mini-brains make new connections
Fred ‘Rusty’ Gage (USA) is making mini-brains from human stem cells in the lab. But in order for these new tissues to function, they need to become well-connected.

Fred is pioneering research to explore how transplanted human neural organoids (mini-organs) can mature into tissues with blood vessel and nerve connections. This work could lead to methods of replacing brain tissue lost to stroke or disease, and repairing spinal cords damaged by trauma.

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Treating diabetes; turning skin cells into brain cells; hearts in a dish

Today

It’s Day 2 of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) 2018 Annual Meeting at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre: more than 2,500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries will hear from 150+ speakers, including:

Treating type 1 diabetes with stem cells
A Harvard team has shown they can control glucose levels in mice using a transplant of insulin-producing cells made from human stem cells. Doug Melton presents his research today.

His effort to fight diabetes involves a 30-person lab at Harvard and a start-up company, Semma Therapeutics, which he named after his children. His son Sam and daughter Emma both have type 1 diabetes.
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Cells, salamanders and what’s wrong with US ‘right to try’ laws

Today:

  • Could you regrow an arm or a leg? Salamanders can.
  • Should you be allowed to try unapproved treatments—without the FDA tick—when you’re terminally ill? President Trump says yes.

It’s Day 1 of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) 2018 Annual Meeting at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre: more than 2,500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries will hear from 150+ speakers, including:

Taking stem cell science from the lab to the clinic, and what’s wrong with the US ‘right to try’ legislation—Roger Barker, UK

ISSCR is concerned about ‘right to try’ legislation just signed into law in the US, which allows terminally ill patients to try risky, unproven treatments without regulation or oversight. Doctors and scientists are alarmed. They say current compassionate use provisions allow access.

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Stem cell invasion: 2,500 researchers in Melbourne

Mending broken hearts and burnt eyes, and much more

  • Stem cells are saving lives today—through bone marrow and cord blood transplants
  • There are trials making new skin, restoring sight, treating diabetes, repairing the brain
  • But we’ll also hear of the dangers of risky treatments, snake oil merchants, and new Australian and US regulations.

More than 2,500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries are in Melbourne this week for the massive International Society for Stem Cell Research 2018 Annual Meeting. It’s taking place from 20-23 June at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre. Here are some highlights and we’ll have daily alerts for you with more people and ideas through the week.

Media are welcome.

Developing a stem cell product to cure blindness from burning—Michele De Luca and Graziella Pellegrini, Italy

Italian innovators Graziella Pellegrini and Michele De Luca have seen their work lead to patients regaining eyesight after 20 years of blindness. And it’s led to the world’s first non-blood-related commercial stem cell therapy.

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The Women in Physics lecturer is…; Stargazing world record; and more physics in June

It gives me great pleasure to once again welcome a renowned physicist to Australia for the AIP’s annual Women in Physics lecture tour—and this year we’ve chosen Dr Ceri Brenner from the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK.

Ceri is a high-power laser plasma physicist who works alongside industry, translating her research on the fourth state of matter, into practical real-world applications in medicine, aerospace and more. She’s also a passionate science communicator who I am sure will inspire audiences around the country. More on that below.

Physics also made quite a mark on the media in the past month. Not only was rockstar physicist Brian Cox making the media rounds, but ANU also managed to achieve literally record-breaking numbers of people turning their eyes to the sky for their successful Guinness World Record attempt.

We’ll have another huge physics name down under in September. Kip Thorne has announced a string of tour dates, be sure to support the industry and grab a ticket when they go on sale on 22 June. He’ll be supported by local star of Swinburne astronomy Alan Duffy and comedian Robin Ince.

Some of Australia’s best and brightest physicists were also elected into the Australian Academy of Science Fellowship, one of the highest scientific honours in Australia. Be sure to read all about them, and head to our Facebook page to offer your congratulations. Meanwhile the next generation were representing at FameLab Australia and in the Physics Olympiad. [click to continue…]

Getting more out of your ARC impact statements; meet the 2018 Fresh Scientists at the pub; Science Week is coming; and more

Fresh Science: join us at the pub in Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane and (for the first time) Canberra to meet this year’s Fresh Scientists, 60 early-career researchers with stories to tell.

Details below.

Impact statements: you’ve sweated blood getting them together and uploaded to the ARC. Can you do more with them? Or do you have other research you’d like to promote? We’d love to help you turn them into short impact stories for the public and get them out through your, and our, social media channels.

We’ll also publish a selection of them in our next Stories of Australian Science print publication. If you book five or more stories, we’ll include them as a feature spread with your logo, and design flyers that you can share with partners, hand out at Open Day and the like.

Prices range from $1,300 + GST for a single story to $1,100 + GST per story when you book five or more.

More details below.

National Science Week: more than a million people and 2,000 events—it’s big. As national publicists for the Week we can help publicise any Science Week event that grabs our interest. Make sure you register your event so we can consider it for promotion. And let me know by email if you’ve got something really special happening.

Read on for some of the early highlights.

Pitch and communication training: we have courses coming up around the country.

Melbourne: Tuesday 31 July, Tuesday 9 October
Adelaide: Wednesday 14 November
Sydney: Wednesday 4 July, Wednesday 29 August
Perth: Friday 7 December

You can book via Eventbrite, or read on for more about our bespoke training.

In this bulletin:

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GOING FOR GOLD (IN PHYSICS); HAVE YOUR SAY; PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT; AND MORE: PHYSICS IN MAY

While some of us spent most of last month cheering on the Aussies, especially Cameron McEvoy, in the pool – there is plenty of good physics going on out of the pool as well.

Some of it will be coming to a pub near you as a part of the  Physics in the Pub event series, and there will be even more at the  AIP Congress in Perth in December. Abstract submissions are open until 15 June.

Australia produces some fantastic physicists, and that’s one of the reasons our organisation is so important. It’s great to have a solid community of physicists and physics fans to share their work and get excited about the work of others.

We recognise excellent Australian physics with our AIP medals. There are awards for physicists in a range of disciplines and at all career stages,  have a look at the list below to see if you might be eligible. Nominations close 1 June.

And we want to hear from you.

I get to write to you each month, so now we’re giving you the opportunity to talk back in our regular monthly surveys. The first one is only two questions long, so  check it out

We’re also considering whether a consolidated approach to managing the operations of the AIP could be an efficient use of members funds. Accordingly, we are seeking detailed expressions of interest to deliver AIP Operations, if you’re interested all the details are online.

Finally, I recently joined a meeting with Presidents, CEOs and other leaders of Australia’s most prominent science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) organisations in Canberra, to discuss the important role that science and technology will play in Australia’s future.

As a result, we issued a statement calling for: a whole-of-government plan for science and technology; strategy to equip the future Australian workforce with STEM skills; strong investment in both basic and applied research; and creating policy informed by the best available evidence. You can read our full statement here.

Kind Regards,

Andrew Peele
President, Australian Institute of Physics
aip_president@aip.org.au

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Fresh Science; new CRCs; training around the country; and more

Nominations for Fresh Science – our annual competition for early-career researchers – are open for one more week. So, have a think about which ECRs you could tap on the shoulder to nominate.

We run Fresh Science in every state where we can secure enough support – so far that’s Qld, SA, WA, Vic and NSW. Big thanks to our hosts and the 17 unis and research organisations who’ve come on board so far.

It’s highly likely we will run an event in the ACT, we just need a couple more supporters to confirm.

So, make sure you encourage any Canberra-based ECRs you know to nominate. More on that below.

Nominations close midnight 24 April 2018.

If you’d like to share our flyer calling for nominations, you can download it as a PDFor a JPEG or share the call on social media using #FreshSci

Even if you’re not an ECR, we can still help you find the story in your science.

We’ve just announced our media and communication training dates for the rest of 2018.

Join us in:

  • Melbourne: Tuesday 5 June, Tuesday 31 July, Tuesday 9 October
  • Adelaide: Tuesday 8 May, Wednesday 14 November
  • Sydney: Wednesday 4 July, Wednesday 29 August
  • Perth: Thursday 10 May, Friday 7 December

You can book via Eventbrite, or read on for more about this course and our bespoke training.

Also in this bulletin:

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AIP member benefits; call for Congress abstracts; behind the scenes at Parliament; and more physics in April

Preparations for the 2018 AIP Congress—in Perth, December 9 to

Professor Andrew Peele Interim Director, Australian Synchrotron

Professor Andrew Peele
Interim Director, Australian Synchrotron

13—are now well underway, with most of the plenary speakers announced. And the call for abstracts has just opened. More on both of those below.

This year we are really trying to attract a larger industry presence at the Congress, so please pass on the call for abstracts to those you know who are working in physics outside academia. It would also be great to see a large representation of science teachers at the conference.

Get your abstracts in today to help make this the biggest and best Congress yet.

As you probably know, AIP members receive discounted rates to attend the AIP Congress, but there are many other member benefits too.

This month our Vice President Jodie Bradby shared her thoughts on why all physicists should be members of the AIP. She highlights the great work undertaken by our members, and the events they work tirelessly to make happen.

Also in this bulletin, we hear from an AIP member who represented the AIP at Science meets Parliament earlier this year. Claire Edmunds, a PhD candidate from the University of Sydney and Professor Andre Luiten from the Institute for Photonics & Advanced Sensing (IPAS) were given the chance to network with the most brilliant minds in Australian science and members of parliament—while learning about the value those relationships provide.

I was pleased to hear that the experience was not only beneficial for our representatives and their careers, but was also a whole lot of fun. You can read Claire’s report below and Andre’s in the next edition of Australian Physics.

Finally, a lot of great Australian physics research made its way into the news this month, so be sure to check out some of the great media coverage below.

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PM’s science prizes close Monday; Fresh Science; and how to get media for your research, conferences, and events

Nominations for $750,000 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science close on Monday.

You’ve got to be in it to win it, as they say… and it’s simple to nominate in the first (shortlisting) stage – more below.

We’ll also be opening nominations for Fresh Science next week, our competition for early-career researchers with a story to share.

Now in its 21st year, Fresh Science has trained over 500 scientists to share their science, and generated hundreds of news stories via TV, print, radio and online.

We’re looking for partners around the country and will run Fresh Science in any state or territory where we can secure local support. If you’d like to join us, get in touch.

National Science Week is also fast approaching – and now is the time to register your event, apply for state funding and gain a piece of the action. More below.

We’ll be providing publicity support again this year – including resources on how you can prepare your own media kit. So, if you’re planning an event or speaker with strong media appeal, let us know—email scienceweek@scienceinpublic.com.au and we’ll consider including it in highlights media releases.

We also offer media support for conferences to help you put your field of science in the spotlight and reach beyond the walls of the conference centre. More on that below.

And we’ve got communication training courses coming up in Melbourne (12 April & 5 June), Adelaide (8 May), Perth (10 May), Sydney (4 July). Details below.

I’m in Japan this week, and China next week, and will be posting some of the stories of research collaboration you shared with me via @AusAsiaScience.

If you need more info on any of the above I’ll be on email, or you can call the office on (03) 9398 1416.

Regards,

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Stargazing in science week and prizes galore: Physics in March

One of the year’s highlights for me as AIP President is our Annual

Professor Andrew Peele Director, Australian Synchrotron

Professor Andrew Peele
Director, Australian Synchrotron

Council Meeting, which gives us the chance to meet in person, hear about what our interstate colleagues are up to, and share our vision for the coming year for the AIP.

For me it’s exciting to see the volume of activity being managed through the state branches of the AIP. Not just in the traditional talk formats—where we continue to share some of the newest and best research from around the country—but also events such as physics in the pub, careers nights and debates, which encourage interaction and sharing of ideas.

One of the reasons that physics is able to feature at the highest levels of international science, and at the highest levels of public recognition, is because of the quality of grass-roots activities like these. The Council Meeting is a great way to bring to light some of this work, which can otherwise get overlooked, and to recognise its value.

Reflecting on another grass-roots activity—our first Summer Meeting—I think we can be pleased with the outcome for this first-time event. The low-cost event featured many opportunities for our early-career researchers and students, whilst also providing a collaborative and informative space for productive discussions. I want to thank those who put time and effort into bringing this event to fruition, and I am sure there will be more discussions about how we make the most of this event in the future. Meanwhile, it’s an AIP Congress year this year, so save the dates of 9-14 December, and keep your eyes on this bulletin for calls for content.

It was also my absolute pleasure to present an award for Outstanding Service to Physics at our AGM to Brian James. Brian’s most recent contribution to physics has been editing our member-only magazine Australian Physics for the past five years. Brian deserves to be recognised wholeheartedly for the time, effort and passion he has put into the magazine during his tenure. He will be stepping away from the role in coming months. Peter Kappen and David Hoxley will be taking over the reins and I look forward to a full introduction from them in the magazine pages once they do. Read more about Brian’s award below.

And on the topic of awards, included in this bulletin are the details of a number of science prizes. I’d encourage each state branch to consider who you’ve awarded prizes to over the past 12-18 months, and to put those people forward for some of these awards. We on the National Exec will do the same. If you are working on a nomination, please let us know so we don’t double up.

Kind Regards,

Andrew Peele
President, Australian Institute of Physics
aip_president@aip.org.au

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Starving superbugs in your schnoz; Beatrix Potter the scientist; a hearing aid you’ll want to wear; a year of Days

Starving superbugs in your schnoz;
Beatrix Potter the scientist; a hearing aid you’ll want to wear; a year of Days

Today: starving superbugs, media call 11 am in Adelaide

Scientists are tricking superbugs into gobbling up the bacteria-equivalent of poisonous chocolate.

Dr Katharina Richter and colleagues from the University of Adelaide have begun the first human trials of the treatment at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

They’re looking for patients with antibiotic-resistant sinus infections.

More below.

Thursday: Beatrix Potter, Vera Rubin, Elizabeth Gould and other forgotten women of science

Celebrate them this International Women’s Day, 8 March

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Case studies; build your profile; comms training; the PM’s Science Prizes and more

Case studies and profile building

We can help you raise the profile of your research and researchers by:

  • writing case studies and stories for you to use with your institution’s communication platforms
  • publishing your stories via social media, media, the web, your stakeholders, flyers and our Stories of Australian Science
  • teaching your researchers how to tell and pitch their own stories.

For example, for $5,000 we can write 10 short case studies; for $10,000 we can write them, share them, and get some attention for your researchers. If you’d like more information give me a call – 0417 131 977.

China and Japan 

If you’ve had any recent success with collaborations in China or Japan, I’d love to hear about it. I’m visiting China and Japan at the end of the month with a City of Melbourne Business Mission. I’ll be tweeting and We-Chatting about great collaborations in research and also drawing on our past lists and case studies: http://stories.scienceinpublic.com.au/japanand http://stories.scienceinpublic.com.au/china

Training

Communication training for researchers is happening around the country over the next few months. If your researchers need some guidance, mentoring or practice in media interviews, social media or pitching, check out the courses in Sydney, Perth, Adelaide, and Melbourne. Details below.

The Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science

$750,000 for science/innovation/teaching—nominations for the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science now open

Have you ever nominated someone for a prize? Felt the buzz on anticipation when you hear they are a finalist? Shared the thrill as they win? Then watched the impact it has on their career?

It’s time to put forward your unrecognised leaders and your rising stars for a Prime Minister’s Prize for Science. And if you don’t have time to drive the nomination, pass this email on to someone who does.

And more prizes

Read on for details about the PM’s Prizes and other prizes open right now including the Eureka’s, L’Oréal, Tall Poppies and Academy awards.

Regards,

Niall

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It’s time to nominate

Prizes

Yes, I know it’s only the second week of February. But it’s time to start thinking about nominations for the big prizes.

The $750,000 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science open on 21 February. Across the Prizes, it would be great to see more nominations of innovators, more women for the science prizes, and more men for the teacher prizes. And Victorian teachers as Victoria has only one teacher recognised to date.

Read on for more information on changes to the Prime Minister’s Prizes.

We’ve also updated our Science Prizes Calendar to help you track all the opportunities we’re aware of. The Eurekas, FameLab and CRC Innovation awards are open now, and the Academy of Science’s honours open soon. More below.

Australians of the Year

It was a great start to 2018 seeing quantum physicist Michelle Simmons, photosynthesis guru Graham Farquhar, and superstar maths teacher and YouTube sensation Eddie Woo recognised as Australians of the Year.

We also counted 11 scientists in the Australia Day Honours.
Our list is below. Let us know who we missed.

Nominations are now open for the 2019 Australian of the Year, and details of how to nominate someone for an Order of Australia are on the Governor General’s website.

Outreach training

Train your scientists in how to talk to the media, government and other stakeholders at one of our courses around Australia.

We’ll be in Melbourne (12 April, 5 June), Sydney (7 March, 4 July), Adelaide (8 May), Perth (10 May) and other cities by demand.
Details below.

And Science Meets Parliament kicks off tomorrow. Look out for Tanya Ha, our engagement director and a member of the STA executive. And I’ll be there for the big Parliament House dinner.

In this bulletin:

Australia Day Honours
Changes to the Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science
Fresh Science winners and 2018 dates announced
Other science prizes and other opportunities
Shaping the future for early-career researchers
Communication training dates
Dates for the big events – World Science Festival, National Science Week and others
Kind regards,

Niall

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Physics in the limelight, let’s keep it there; AIP AGM; LIGO lecture and more

Professor Andrew Peele Interim Director, Australian Synchrotron

Professor Andrew Peele
Interim Director, Australian Synchrotron

I am very excited about starting 2018 with Michelle Simmons awarded Australian of the Year – what better way is there to bring physics into the limelight than having people discussing the benefits of quantum physics.

Michelle is a great advocate for our discipline, women in science and physics education – her 2017 Australia Day Address was a great example.  We offer our sincere congratulations to Michelle on this honour, and you can share your messages with her too via our Facebook post.

I’d also like to offer congratulations to those physicists awarded in the Australia Day honours roll – see list below.

These accolades are a timely reminder that the only reason physicists win these awards is because someone nominates them.

Nominations are now open for Australian of the Year 2019 and the honours roll. You can also nominate for FameLab, the Eureka Prizes, Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science and many other awards will open in the coming months.

So let’s make sure we keep the momentum going, think about who you can nominate to keep physics in the spotlight.

Last but not least, this month we also recognise Professor David McClelland – who has been awarded the Walter Boas Medal for key contributions to LIGO, and “one of the greatest achievements in the history of physics”, the discovery of gravitational waves. You can read more about David’s achievements below.

You can hear more from David at a Public Lecture at Melbourne’s RMIT on 15 February, immediately after the AIP’s AGM.

I hope to see you there.

Regards,

Andrew Peele
President, Australian Institute of Physics
aip_president@aip.org.au

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