Evolution Festival

 

 

 

 

Highlighting our work marking Darwin’s anniversaries in 2009:

  • his 200th birthday
  • the naming of the Port of Darwin 170 years ago and;
  • the publication of On the Origin of Species 150 years ago.

Our work on Evolution The Festival was supported by the Commonwealth Department of Innovation, Industry, Science & Research.

A conversation with Sarah Darwin and Tall Ship experience

A conversation with Sarah Darwin and Tall Ship experience

Thursday 25 February 2010, 5.45pm (tallship tours from 4pm)
Nelson Room, Seaworks, 82 Nelson Place Williamstown (Melways 56 E10).
Entry off Nelson Place (metered parking)

Sarah is Charles Darwin’s great, great granddaughter and a biologist. She is retracing her ancestor’s steps on the Dutch clipper Stad Amsterdam for TV station VPRO.

Sarah and her project colleagues Redmond O’Hanlon and Hans Fels will discuss the expedition, the science and what it means for them to recreate the voyage of the Beagle.

[continue reading…]

Genographic ‘snapshot’ provides insights into Melbourne’s genetic melting pot

Results from Journey of Your Genes Public Swabbing Event Revealed

MELBOURNE (3 Dec, 2009), The Governor of Victoria, His Excellency Prof. David de Kretser, AC, shares the same Y chromosome ‘haplogroup’ with World Vision’s  Tim Costello with both men’s Genographic Project DNA test showing they are R1b – migrating out of Africa around 45,000 years ago and eventually living in Europe (70% of men from southern England belong to this group).

Their ‘deep ancestry’ Genographic Project results form part of an interesting ‘snapshot’ looking at Melbourne’s diversity [continue reading…]

Genographic 'snapshot' provides insights into Melbourne's genetic melting pot

Results from Journey of Your Genes Public Swabbing Event Revealed

MELBOURNE (3 Dec, 2009), The Governor of Victoria, His Excellency Prof. David de Kretser, AC, shares the same Y chromosome ‘haplogroup’ with World Vision’s  Tim Costello with both men’s Genographic Project DNA test showing they are R1b – migrating out of Africa around 45,000 years ago and eventually living in Europe (70% of men from southern England belong to this group).

Their ‘deep ancestry’ Genographic Project results form part of an interesting ‘snapshot’ looking at Melbourne’s diversity [continue reading…]

Evolution: random or predictable?

Evolution shows an eerie predictability, according to Professor Simon Conway Morris. In a series of lectures, he will argue that evolution is not as uncertain as it might seem.

Simon Conway Morris, a professor in Cambridge University’s department of earth sciences, is an accomplished scientist, a committed Christian and a gifted communicator. First applauded for his work on the fossils of the Burgess shale, he continues to research early life on Earth. He has made significant contributions to discussions on the philosophical implications of evolution and actively debates the relationship between religion and science. [continue reading…]

Find out the ‘Journey of Your Genes’

The Genographic Project

MELBOURNE RESIDENTS CELEBRATE THEIR DIVERSITY BY PARTICIPATING IN THE GENOGRAPHIC PROJECT

Your deep ancestry dating back 60,000 years revealed

Have you ever wanted to know where your ancient ancestors came from – dating back 60,000 years? Now Melbourne residents, who collectively make up one of the most diverse populations in the world, have the opportunity to find out their deep migratory history when Melbourne University hosts ‘The Journey of Your Genes…The Genographic Project Traces Your Family Roots,’ a special free public event.

On Sunday 4 October from 10am – 2pm, as part of Evolution the Festival, the public will be invited to come to Melbourne University’s Bio 21 Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville and be guided through a free cheek swab worth over $100 from The Genographic Project – a partnership of National Geographic and IBM with field support by the Waitt Family Foundation. [continue reading…]