Centenary Institute

Award Ceremony: 2019 Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Awards

The Centenary Institute’s Medical Innovation Awards recognise some of Australia’s inspirational young post-doctoral scientists and provided a catalyst for them to gain wider recognition for their research projects, particularly in the funding arena.

The 1st place $30,000 In Memory of Neil Lawrence Prize, sponsored by
Commonwealth Private, will be presented to the biomedical research scientist based in Australia who demonstrates the most creative and innovative approach to their research concept.

The researcher positioned in 2nd place will receive the Bayer Innovation Award of $15,000.The Harvard Club of Australia Foundation will provide a $5,000 Travel Prize to one of the finalists to undertake a study tour to Harvard University in Boston, USA.

The People’s Choice Award will enable the Australian public to engage with the Awards, having the opportunity to vote in the $2,000 People’s Choice Award.

Nominations close 5 July 2019

People’s choice voting closes 5 August 2019

Award ceremony will be held on 21 August 2019 in Sydney

For more, visit: https://www.centenary.org.au/cimia/ 

Nominations Close: 2019 Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Awards

The Centenary Institute’s Medical Innovation Awards recognise some of Australia’s inspirational young post-doctoral scientists and provided a catalyst for them to gain wider recognition for their research projects, particularly in the funding arena.

The 1st place $30,000 In Memory of Neil Lawrence Prize, sponsored by
Commonwealth Private, will be presented to the biomedical research scientist based in Australia who demonstrates the most creative and innovative approach to their research concept.

The researcher positioned in 2nd place will receive the Bayer Innovation Award of $15,000.The Harvard Club of Australia Foundation will provide a $5,000 Travel Prize to one of the finalists to undertake a study tour to Harvard University in Boston, USA.

The People’s Choice Award will enable the Australian public to engage with the Awards, having the opportunity to vote in the $2,000 People’s Choice Award.

Nominations close 5 July 2019

People’s choice voting closes 5 August 2019

Award ceremony will be held on 21 August 2019 in Sydney

For more, visit: https://www.centenary.org.au/cimia/ 

Nominations Open: 2019 Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Awards

The Centenary Institute’s Medical Innovation Awards recognise some of Australia’s inspirational young post-doctoral scientists and provided a catalyst for them to gain wider recognition for their research projects, particularly in the funding arena.

The 1st place $30,000 In Memory of Neil Lawrence Prize, sponsored by
Commonwealth Private, will be presented to the biomedical research scientist based in Australia who demonstrates the most creative and innovative approach to their research concept.

The researcher positioned in 2nd place will receive the Bayer Innovation Award of $15,000.The Harvard Club of Australia Foundation will provide a $5,000 Travel Prize to one of the finalists to undertake a study tour to Harvard University in Boston, USA.

The People’s Choice Award will enable the Australian public to engage with the Awards, having the opportunity to vote in the $2,000 People’s Choice Award.

Nominations close 5 July 2019

People’s choice voting closes 5 August 2019

Award ceremony will be held on 21 August 2019 in Sydney

For more, visit: https://www.centenary.org.au/cimia/ 

Indonesian and Australian scientists test new TB vaccine targets for the TB fight in Indonesia and Australia

World TB Day on March 24 reminds us of the growing TB threat

Scientists available for interview in English and Bahasa Indonesia for World TB Day. Read the release in Bahasa Indonesia.
More images below.

Better vaccines are needed for the global fight against tuberculosis (TB). The Global Fund reports an estimated nine million new cases globally per year of TB, which is second only to AIDS as the world’s most deadly infectious disease. Indonesia had more than 320,000 reported cases in 2014 according to the World Health Organization, while Australia’s reported cases were just over 1,000. But the rise of drug-resistant TB poses a threat to all countries.

Two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium have shown promising results in investigations in mice for a new vaccine. Scientists from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney, with colleagues at Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) in Yogyakarta, have found that the injected proteins can prime the immune system to induce protection against TB in mice.

The team has established a laboratory and immunological techniques to test if the two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium can be used as the basis for a vaccine. Credit: Centenary Institute

The team has established a laboratory and immunological techniques to test if the two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium can be used as the basis for a vaccine. Credit: Centenary Institute

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Using diet to cope with the aftermath of stroke

Connie Wong 1_LR$25,000 Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize goes to young Melbourne researcher

One of Australia’s most creative young medical researchers has won a $25,000 prize to help her develop her ideas on how diet could prevent stroke deaths.

Connie Wong thinks we may be able to prevent early deaths following stroke with a fibre-based diet. She initially used innovative microscope techniques to determine how stroke weakens the immune system. Now she is studying how it also induces leakiness in the gut wall, leading to infection and an upsurge in deaths. And the solution may well lie in diet.

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Keeping our best young bioscience brains in Australia

Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize to be announced, finalists from Melbourne and Sydney

The winner of the Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize will be announced at 6.30 pm, Tuesday 12 November 2013, at a reception hosted by UBS in Sydney.

There are three finalists. On Tuesday we will find out who is the overall winner of the $25,000 prize. The two runners-up will each receive $5,000.

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Simple cough could save lives from TB

A community-wide screening program being trialled in Vietnam aims to create a new model for global TB control

In the 1950s and 1960s Australians were accustomed to having regular chest x-rays in a caravan, parked in their suburb, to screen for TB. During this time TB almost (but not quite) disappeared from Australia and the program was phased out.

Now Australian researchers from the Centenary Institute, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research and the Centre of Research Excellence on TB Control will assess the potential for a similar program of regular community-wide screening to have the same impact on TB in Vietnam, a country in which TB is still very common and costs many lives. However, instead of x-rays the team will use a new molecular test that is performed on sputum coughed up from patient’s lungs to detect TB. They hope their work will serve as a model for countries with a high burden of TB in our region and elsewhere.

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Keeping our best young bioscience brains in Australia: Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize

The winner of the Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize will be announced at 12.30 pm, Thursday 15 November 2012, at a lunch at UBS in Sydney.

He will receive $25,000, and a glass trophy designed by Australian sculptor Nick Mount.

The 2012 finalists are:

  • Robert McLaughlin, a medical engineer from the University of Western Australia (UWA), who has developed an optical probe that fits inside a hypodermic needle and can help surgeons accurately determine the boundaries of breast cancer tumours.
  • Marc Pellegrini, from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI), whose discoveries about how the body regulates its immune system are being applied to clinical trials of cancer vaccines and treatments for HIV and hepatitis.
  • Jian Yang, from the Diamantina Institute at the University of Queensland, who has solved a major puzzle of missing heritability by developing software and methods to determine the multiple genes involved in conditions such as schizophrenia, obesity and diabetes.

How galaxies grow up; turmeric could fight malaria; and the PM’s Science Prizes

A Sydney astronomer Amanda Bauer has discovered and studied a distant cluster of galaxies to find out how galaxies evolve and interact with their neighbours. Her work will help explain the fate of our own Milky Way.

This intergalactic yarn is our latest Fresh Science story. More next week.

Australia and India will work together to study the impact on cerebral malaria of the major ingredient of turmeric, curcumin.

Dr Saparna Pai from the Centenary Institute in Sydney is off to New Delhi for the study.

Centenary is also celebrating over $5 million in grants for research into cardiology, TB, aging and immunology.

And the Prime Minister’s Prizes are approaching – 31 October with a 5 pm embargo. Details if you need them will be available on embargo from tomorrow.

US defence to work with Australian science, fighting ancient killer in Vietnam, how do kids brains cope with disaster?

Healthy human brain shown via medical imaging Credit: Matthew Purdy
The US spends $80 billion on defence research but still thinks they can learn from our nanotechnologists. They’re meeting with Australian nano-leaders this week in DC.

More on that below, and also:

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Risking cancer to avoid nano-sunscreen and heads-up on SKA and World TB Day

Welcome back – this is my first 2012 bulletin for journalists interested in science.

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Starving cancer and other stories

Prostate cancers are made up of hungry, growing cells. Now we’ve discovered how to cut off their food supply thanks to a study published in Cancer Research and supported by Movember. More below.

Also Australian science discoveries you may have missed from the past week.

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Starving prostate cancer


Prostate cancers are hungry, growing cells. Now we know how to cut off their food supply thanks to research to be published later this month in Cancer Research—work funded by Movember and the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

Researchers at the Centenary Institute in Sydney have discovered a potential future treatment for prostate cancer—through starving the tumour cells of an essential nutrient they need to grow rapidly. [continue reading…]

Immune peacekeepers discovered

How our skin says, “Don’t worry, these are good guys,” revealed today in PNAS.

There are more bacteria living on our skin and in our gut than cells in our body. We need them. But until now no-one knew how the immune system could tell that these bacteria are harmless.

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Immune peacekeepers discovered; Nobel Laureate speaks out; dark energy in Brisbane and more…

Science in Public media bulletin 18 October 2011.

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