Nature

Australia is number 12 in high quality global research in Nature Index

Press release from Springer Nature

Group of Eight jostle for high-quality scientific research leadership in Australia

Australia is placed 12th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the Nature Index Tables released together today.

Australia is just ahead of India and three places behind South Korea. The US leads the index, followed by China, Germany, the UK and Japan.

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Movers and shakers in the world of high-quality scientific research

Press release from Springer Nature

The US is the world’s largest contributor to high-quality scientific research papers, followed by China and Germany, according to the Nature Index 2016 Tables. Of the top ten countries in the Nature Index, only China has shown double-digit compound annual growth between 2012 and 2015 with some of its universities growing their contribution to the index as fast as 25% annually. US contributions have declined 2.8% in the same period from a very high base.

The Nature Index Tables, which show Nature Index calendar year outputs for the last four years, are released together today for the first time. The Nature Index is built on a country or institution’s contribution to about 60,000 high-quality papers each year, and counts both the total number of papers and the relative contribution to each paper. (See notes for editors for full definitions of measures.)

Harvard University, US, has the highest 2015 contribution of any university in the world. Stanford University (second), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (fourth), University of California, Berkeley (seventh), University of California, San Diego (ninth) and University of Michigan (tenth) — all from the US — occupy top ten positions. The University of Tokyo, Japan, is placed third, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, UK, are fifth and sixth, respectively, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, is placed eighth.

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University of Otago is New Zealand’s top high quality research contributor in the Nature Index

Press release from Springer Nature

Otago at 303 in global index of thousands of universities, ahead of Auckland at 386

New Zealand is 30th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the Nature Index Tables released together today. That puts it just behind Ireland, but ahead of Saudi Arabia, Chile, and Argentina.

The US remains the world’s largest contributor to high-quality scientific research papers, followed by China and Germany, according to the Nature Index 2016 Tables. Australia is 12th.

The University of Otago is New Zealand’s leading research university in the index, placed 303 in the world ahead of the University of Auckland at 386.

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Singapore: a regional research power in Nature Index

Press release from Springer Nature

NTU at 32 in global index of universities with NUS at 40 

Singapore is 17th globally for its contribution to high-quality scientific research papers, according to the 2016 Nature Index Tables released together today. That puts it behind Australia (in 12th place) but in front of Taiwan (18) and Russia (19).

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) appears as Singapore’s leading research university in the index, placed 32 in the world among universities ahead of National University of Singapore (NUS) at 40. Both are well in front of Seoul National University and of Australia’s top universities.

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Where does Australia rank in research? And the Mythbusters are coming to Australia…

Australia has taken the podium alongside Japan and China as one of the top three science performers in a dynamic Asia-Pacific region. The Nature Publishing Index is a snapshot of the region’s scientific research in the past year based on publication output in Nature and the 17 Nature research journals.

And from chart topping to myth busting – the Mythbusters are coming to Australia during National Science Week.

Read on for more…

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Single-atom writer a landmark for quantum computing

Posted on behalf of the University of New South Wales

A research team led by Australian engineers has created the first working quantum bit based on a single atom in silicon, opening the way to ultra-powerful quantum computers of the future.

In a landmark paper published today in the journal Nature, the team describes how it was able to both read and write information using the spin, or magnetic orientation, of an electron bound to a single phosphorus atom embedded in a silicon chip.

“For the first time, we have demonstrated the ability to represent and manipulate data on the spin to form a quantum bit, or ‘qubit’,  the basic unit of data for a quantum computer,” says Scientia Professor Andrew Dzurak. “This really is the key advance towards realising a silicon quantum computer based on single atoms.”

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How does Nature rate your institution, PM's Prizes open, global vaccines and more

Please help us identify the unsung achievers of Australian science for the Prime Ministers, and welcome to my occasional email to the science community on prizes and other activities.

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How does Nature rate your institution, PM’s Prizes open, global vaccines and more

Please help us identify the unsung achievers of Australian science for the Prime Ministers, and welcome to my occasional email to the science community on prizes and other activities.

[continue reading…]