vaccines

Whooping cough is fighting back.

Researchers discover how whooping cough is evolving paving the way to a new vaccine.

Whooping cough strains are adapting to better infect humans, a team of Sydney researchers has found.

The scientists, led by microbiologist Dr Laurence Luu of the University of New South Wales, may have solved the mystery of why, despite widespread vaccinations, the respiratory disease has been resurgent in Australia across the past decade. There have been more than 200,000 cases recorded during the period.

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JABBED: a public forum on love, fear and vaccines

Public forum Wednesday, 5 June 2013

Diseases that were largely eradicated forty years ago are returning. Across the world children are getting sick and dying from preventable conditions because nervous parents are skipping their children’s shots.

Yet the stories of vaccine reactions are frightening, with cases of people being damaged, even killed, by vaccines. How do we decide whether to vaccinate or not, and what are the real risks?

  • Why are Melbourne babies getting whooping cough?
  • Why are measles epidemics appearing in Europe?
  • Why does vaccination remain so controversial?
  • While more than 90% of Australians support vaccination, why are many of us delaying or refusing vaccines?
  • What’s going wrong with the community conversation about vaccination?

Explore these issues and more at a public forum with Sonya Pemberton, the producer of JABBED, a documentary premiering on SBS TV on Sunday 26 May 2013. [continue reading…]

Vaccines to change the world – public forum in Melbourne

Vaccines to change the world – Australia’s role in a critical global health mission – immunising against deadly diseases

This forum marks the launch of Australia’s Role in the World, a partnership initiative between The Australian Institute of International Affairs, The University of Melbourne and UN Youth Australia to engage young people, academia and the wider public in debate about major global issues.

6:30-8:00pm, Thursday 22 March 2012 in the Spot Basement Lecture Theatre, 198 Berkeley St.

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Oz research of note, 11 December, 2011

A new sugar that could prevent heart disease; an Alzheimer’s vaccine that cures the memory of mice; real Star Wars bacteria and robot aircraft that copy insects are just some of the interesting stories that emerged from Australian research published in the last week. Find over a dozen other stories below.

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Science in Public this week (21- 25 Nov 2011)

Monday: Niall’s in Canberra for the $50,000 CSL Florey Medal announcement.  Release and images here.

Tuesday: Niall’s at the Excellence in Health Journalism awards at the National Press Club. Update: Niall accepted the Health Journalist of the Year 2011 award on behalf of Melbourne film-maker Sonya Pemberton.  More here.

Wednesday: Blamey & Saunders Hearing’s new name and office are being launched by Michelle Gallaher, CEO of the BioMelbourne Network

Thursday: For 30 years the Menzies Foundation has been awarding scholarships to researchers in health sciences and the humanities.
Tim’s off to the 2011 Menzies Memorial Scholars announcement tonight – more information here.

Australia commits $US58 million to global vaccines initiative

This commitment is great news and a wonderful follow-up to the UN global health conference held in Melbourne last month. Here’s the media release from GAVI – the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization.

Mary Robinson, Chair of the GAVI Alliance Board, welcomes the new commitment, which will help save the lives of 4.2 million children

(issued by GAVI)
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