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The 22nd  Australian Institute of Physics Congress was held as a joint conference with the 13th Asia Pacific Physics Conference in December 2016.

Below are the media releases, media alerts and other news items released during the Congress. The  proceeding were also tweeted from @AsiaAusPhysics and @ausphysics on #BrisPhys16. The conference website is appc-aip2016.org.au.

If you’d like more information on any of these stories, please contact

Shape shifting particles; underground labs; QLD’s forgotten Nobel Prize winner; and more

Sunday 4 December 2016

  • Highlights from Day 1 of the Physics Congress
  • Australian and international researchers available for interview throughout the week
  • For more highlights, and daily updates visit www.scienceinpublic.com.au/physicscongress

Our neutrino world – explained by 2015 Nobel Prize winner Professor Takaaki Kajita

We live in a world of neutrinos. Thousands of billions of neutrinos—mostly created by the Sun—are flowing through your body every second. You cannot see them and you do not feel them. So how did we discover they have mass, and why does that challenge our standard model of the Universe?

Professor Kajita will give a public lecture, telling the story of shape-shifting particles and underground super-labs on Monday night hosted by Australian physicist Hans Bachor (ANU), with early career astrophysicist Tamara Davis (UQ) and neutrino physicist Yvonne Wong (UNSW).  [continue reading…]

A week of physics stories – starting Monday: our neutrino world; hunting dark matter; Australia’s role in big international science; and more

 

More on these and other stories from this week’s Physics Congress below. [continue reading…]

A week of physics stories – starting Monday

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The biennial Physics Congress in Brisbane
4 to 8 December

Researchers from every State plus international and Asian leaders
All stories embargoed until released during the Congress.

 

The biggest discovery of 2016 – gravitational waves. Hear from one of the leaders on what’s next.

Einstein said we’d never find them. But we did. Have more been found? What’s Australia’s role, and why should we care? Researchers from Canberra, Melbourne, and Perth will talk about their work on gravitational waves.

Our neutrino world – explained by 2015 Nobel Prize winner Takaaki Kajita

We live in a world of neutrinos. Thousands of billions of neutrinos—mostly created by the Sun—are flowing through your body every second. You cannot see them and you do not feel them. So how did we discover they have mass, and why does that challenge our standard model of the Universe? Kajita will also be meeting with school students.

$20 billion, with a result is expected in 2035. The world’s largest science experiment hopes to crack fusion power.

Speakers from around the world, including senior advisor to the ITER project Jean Jacquinot, will speak about the global race to harness the process that powers our Sun. Researchers from ANU will be available to speak about Australia’s involvement. [continue reading…]

Shape-shifting particles and underground super labs: 2015 Nobel Prize winner tells his story

aip2016-web-banner-thinPublic Lecture 7pm Monday 5 December

Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Great Halls 1 & 2

Register for the event here: www.trybooking.com/OBQF

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We live in a world of neutrinos. Thousands of billions of neutrinos—mostly created by the Sun—are flowing through your body every second. You cannot see them and you do not feel them; and they are very hard for scientists to measure.

Then, when scientists were finally able to catch them, there were fewer than they expected. But why? Was our Sun losing its power?

Join us on Monday 5 December for a free public lecture by the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015, Professor Takaaki Kajita: the man credited with the discovery of neutrino oscillations, and the solution to this riddle. [continue reading…]

Stawell to join the search for the missing 85 per cent of our galaxy

Victorian government supports plans to build a dark matter laboratory deep in Stawell Gold Mine.

The Victorian government has committed $1.75 million to help Australian scientists hunt for dark matter a kilometre underground in the Stawell gold mine in regional Victoria. The project will commence once the Federal government provides matching support from their regional development program.

[continue reading…]

Four degrees – a message for Lima; laser privacy; letting the quantum cat out of the box

Tomorrow at the national physics and optics conference in Canberra:

  • The catastrophe of a four degree temperature rise – clouds not helping
  • LabPunk – scientific jewellery
  • Letting the quantum cat out of the box
  • Finding airports on Alpha Centauri’s planets
  • Laser beams guarantee data privacy for companies and governments
  • Shrinking X-ray microscopes down to fit on the laboratory bench
  • Using science to create patterns
  • Bending light for faster communication and light-driven computing

There’s more information on these below and much more at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/category/conferences/physicscongress

[continue reading…]