VIC

Job opportunities

Science Communicator role

We’re looking for an early-career science communicator fulltime or near fulltime to join our team in Melbourne or Sydney. This is a junior role for someone with:

  • qualifications in science and demonstrated skill for communication; or
  • journalism training and demonstrated skill and passion for science.

You must love science, be organised, client oriented and willing to learn.

Day to day you will be backing up our team and learning on the job. Ideally you will have some of the following skills:

  • ability to write short, lively and accurate copy;
  • experience in using Outlook, WordPress and/or MailChimp, social media platforms in particular Tweetdeck;
  • editing;
  • media pitching.

Salary is $55,000 to $65,000 plus super depending on experience. This is a 1-year contract with a 2-month probation period and the opportunity for extension.

More information about us and our work at www.scienceinpublic.com.au

Please send your CV, portfolio and a brief cover note describing your key skills and what you want to do in science communication to Sarah Brooker sarah@scienceinpublic.com.au by Wednesday 13 March 2019.

 

 

Media Release: Melbourne steps up to drive global health

Images, video overlay, two case studies (rotavirus vaccine and TB in adolescents) and backgrounder available.

Melbourne Children’s Global Health initiative to take action for the:

  • Two million children dying annually from pneumonia and diarrhoea
  • 8 million new child and youth cases of TB each year
  • Mental health and wellbeing of youth caught up in global unemployment, civic unrest, conflict, urbanisation and migration
  • Hospitals and health workers who want training and education to help them save their young patients.

Three of Australia’s child health leaders are joining forces to tackle global child health. Melbourne Children’s Global Health will build on the achievements of the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI), the Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) and the University of Melbourne. [continue reading…]

Backgrounder: What is Melbourne Children’s Global Health? What will we do?

Melbourne Children’s Global Health is an initiative to improve the health of children and adolescents in disadvantaged populations globally through partnerships in research, public health, education and advocacy.

The initiative has been created by Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, the University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics, and the Royal Children’s Hospital under the auspices of the Melbourne Children’s Campus, and with the support of the Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation.

[continue reading…]

Images: Melbourne Global

For hi-res versions please click on the photo and then right click to download the file.

The first baby in Indonesia to be vaccinated with the new vaccine. (Credit: Melbourne Children’s Campus)

The midwives and doctor at the Jatinom Primary Health Centre in Klaten District, Central Java, which is connected to the new rotavirus trial. (Credit: Melbourne Children’s Campus)

[continue reading…]

New coating cuts barnacle build-up to keep ships at sea longer

Footage of HMAS Canberra  available. Photos and video below.

A new corrosion-resistant coating that halved the build-up of algae and barnacles on ship hydraulic components is now being trialled on HMAS Canberra, one of the Royal Australian Navy landing helicopter dock ships.

Corrosion-resistant coating that halved the build-up of algae and barnacles.
Credit: Defence Science Technology

Researchers from Swinburne University of Technology are collaborating with experts from the Defence Materials Technology Centre, MacTaggart Scott Australia, United Surface Technologies and the Defence Science and Technology Group to advance the new technology.

[continue reading…]

Racism, robots, Frankenstein, parasites, and the search for new planets

Launch tonight 5.30pm at Docklands, with volcanic link to Frankenstein. Plus 400+ Science Week events around Victoria:

  • Are there habitable planets outside our solar system? Meet NASA scientists and planet hunters
  • The first robot story, staged in a working medical research lab
  • The world’s most powerful laser. Meet Ceri Brenner, the UK physicist pressing FIRE
  • How your brain makes you racist: US neuroscientist Larry Sherman explains prejudice
  • Close-up photos of the beautiful killers of biomedical science
  • Humans 2.0: what’s the future look like for humanity?
  • Can science help us fight the war on waste?
  • Comedy meets the brainstem (the ‘arse end of the brain’)
  • Parasites take over the Art Gallery of Ballarat
  • Help build a better picture of the Great Barrier Reef’s health, without getting your feet wet.

[continue reading…]

Treating diabetes; turning skin cells into brain cells; hearts in a dish

20-23 June 2018 at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

International Society for Stem Cell Research 2018 Annual Meeting: 2,500+ stem cell scientists from 50 countries will hear from 150+ speakers including:

Treating type 1 diabetes with stem cells

A Harvard team has shown they can control glucose levels in mice using a transplant of insulin-producing cells made from human stem cells. Doug Melton presents his research today.

His effort to fight diabetes involves a 30-person lab at Harvard and a start-up company, Semma Therapeutics, which he named after his children. His son Sam and daughter Emma both have type 1 diabetes.

Skin cells become brain cells to solve a mystery

Queensland researchers have taken skin cells from a young patient with a rare genetic brain condition and turned them into stem cells that are coaxed to become brain cells. Massimo Damiani has now passed away, but his legacy of growing  brain cells in the lab could help others with this rare condition.

Hearts in a dish helping personalised medicine

Queensland researchers have taken skin cells from a young patient with a rare genetic brain condition and turned them into stem cells that are coaxed to become brain cells. Massimo Damiani has now passed away, but his legacy of growing  brain cells in the lab could help others with this rare condition.

Christine Mummery and her Dutch research team have discovered that heart cells made from patient stem cells with known mutations predicted the electrical heart problems and drug sensitivities observed in the patients themselves.

Christine is co-author of the book Stem Cells: Scientific Facts and Fiction.

[continue reading…]

Treating diabetes; turning skin cells into brain cells; hearts in a dish

Today

It’s Day 2 of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) 2018 Annual Meeting at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre: more than 2,500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries will hear from 150+ speakers, including:

Treating type 1 diabetes with stem cells
A Harvard team has shown they can control glucose levels in mice using a transplant of insulin-producing cells made from human stem cells. Doug Melton presents his research today.

His effort to fight diabetes involves a 30-person lab at Harvard and a start-up company, Semma Therapeutics, which he named after his children. His son Sam and daughter Emma both have type 1 diabetes.
[continue reading…]

Cells, salamanders and what’s wrong with US ‘right to try’ laws

Today:

  • Could you regrow an arm or a leg? Salamanders can.
  • Should you be allowed to try unapproved treatments—without the FDA tick—when you’re terminally ill? President Trump says yes.

It’s Day 1 of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) 2018 Annual Meeting at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre: more than 2,500 stem cell scientists from 50 countries will hear from 150+ speakers, including:

Taking stem cell science from the lab to the clinic, and what’s wrong with the US ‘right to try’ legislation—Roger Barker, UK

ISSCR is concerned about ‘right to try’ legislation just signed into law in the US, which allows terminally ill patients to try risky, unproven treatments without regulation or oversight. Doctors and scientists are alarmed. They say current compassionate use provisions allow access.

[continue reading…]