Monash University Technology Research Platforms

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We\’re helping to publicise the technology research platforms at Monash University.

The 13 platforms – include 3D printing, regenerative medicine using the largest zebra-fish facility in the southern hemisphere, wind noise research, and the latest information and communication technologies.

Last year, we helped the Monash University-led team present the first 3D printed ‘jet engine’ to the world at the Melbourne International Airshow. You can read the story about it here.

The collaboration that has developed between Safran Power Units, Monash University and Amaero Engineering has resulted in some substantial advances toward aerospace qualification of additive manufactured components.

Now they are taking their technology to the heart of Europe’s aerospace industry in Toulouse, France.

For more about the launch event in Paris on 8 November 2016, and password to access media kit, or to arrange an interview contact Niall on +61 417 131 977 niall@scienceinpublic.com.au or call Toni +61 401 763 130, +61 3 9398 1416

 

A 3D printed rocket engine – made in Melbourne

Monash engineers have designed, printed, and test-fired a rocket engine.

Media call 9.30 am, Monday 11 September, Woodside Innovation Centre, New Horizons Building, 20 Research Way, Monash University, Clayton

HD footage of static rocket testing and metal printers at work
Media contact: Niall Byrne, 0417-131-977, niall@scienceinpublic.com.au

The new rocket engine is a unique aerospike design which turns the traditional engine shape inside out.

Two years ago, Monash University researchers and their partners were the first in the world to print a jet engine, based on an existing engine design. That work led to Monash spin-out company Amaero winning contracts with major aerospace companies around the world.

Now a team of engineering researchers have jumped into the Space Age. They accepted a challenge from Amaero to design a rocket engine, Amaero printed their design, and the researchers test-fired it, all in just four months. Their joint achievement illustrates the potential of additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) for Australian industry.

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Monash rocket engine test firing

3D printed rocket engine – backgrounder and links

Backgrounder: the printed Aerospike Rocket Engine

 

Quick facts

  • A joint Monash University/Amaero team of engineers successfully designed, built, and tested a rocket engine in just four months
  • The engine is a complex multi-chamber aerospike design
  • Additively manufactured with selective laser melting on an EOS M280
  • Built from Hasteloy X; a high strength nickel based superalloy
  • Fuel: compressed natural gas (methane); oxidiser: compressed oxygen
  • Design thrust of 4kN (about 1,000 pounds), enough to hover the equivalent of five people (about 400 kg)

The 3D printed or Additive Manufactured aerospike rocket engine is the result of a collaboration between a group of Monash University engineers and Amaero Engineering, supported by Woodside Energy and Monash University.

Engineers at Amaero approached a team of Monash engineering PhD students, giving them the opportunity to create a new rocket design that could fully utilise the near limitless geometric complexity of 3D printing.

The team accepted the challenge and designed one of the most complicated but efficient rocket engines of all, the aerospike nozzle. Amaero printed the design, then the team test-fired their engine on a remote location in rural Victoria. The rapid manufacturing process allowed them to go from concept to physical testing in only four months.

The Monash engineers have now created a company, NextAero, to take their concepts to the global aerospace industry, starting with the International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide on 25-29 September [click to continue…]

Melbourne’s 3D jet engine technology flies into production in France

Launch at the Australian Embassy in Paris, France

Representatives from Monash and Amaero available for interview in Melbourne and Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday. Call Niall (in Paris) on +61 417 131 977 or Toni (in Melbourne) +61 401 763 130.

Amaero and Monash media release

Prof Xinhua Wu

Professor Xinhua Wu. Credit: Monash University

The Monash University-led team who printed a jet engine last year have enabled a new venture for manufacturing aerospace components in France.

Melbourne-based Amaero Engineering—a spin out company from Monash University’s innovation cluster—has signed an agreement with the University and Safran Power Units to print turbojet components for Safran, the French-based global aerospace and defence company.

“Our new facility will be embedded within the Safran Power Units factory in Toulouse and will make components for Safran’s auxiliary power units and turbojet engines,” said Mr Barrie Finnin, CEO of Monash spin-out company Amaero.

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Safran media release

Safran Power Units, Amaero Engineering and Monash University announce a strategic partnership to deliver 3D printing aerospace components

Melbourne’s 3D jet engine technology flies into production in France

Launch at the Australian Embassy in Paris, France

Tuesday 8 November, 2016

French aerospace company Safran Power Units has signed an agreement with Australia’s Amaero Engineering and Monash University to print aerospace components.

“We will make components for auxiliary power units and turbojet engines within the Safran Power Units factory in Toulouse,” said Mr Barrie Finnin, CEO of Monash spin-out company Amaero. [click to continue…]

Safran Power Units, Amaero Engineering et l’Université Monash annoncent un partenariat stratégique pour la production de composants aéronautiques imprimés en 3D

La production de moteurs à réaction basée sur la technologie australienne d’impression 3D démarre en France

Mercredi  9 novembre, 2016

La société aéronautique française Safran Power Units a conclu avec ses partenaires australiens Amaero Engineering et l’Université Monash un accord portant sur l’impression de composants aéronautiques.

« Nous fabriquerons, avec l’usine Safran Power Units de Toulouse, des composants pour les groupes auxiliaires de puissance et les turboréacteurs », explique Barrie Finnin, PDG d’Amaero, une société issue de l’Université Monash. [click to continue…]

The world’s first printed jet engine

Made in Melbourne and on display at the Avalon International Airshow

Opening new manufacturing opportunities for Australia in aerospace, medicine and light industry

Media call 11 am Thursday 26 February at the Victorian Government Stand, Hall 2, Avalon International Airshow. HD overlay of the printers at work also available.

Monash University researchers along with collaborators from CSIRO and Deakin University have printed a jet engine. In fact Monash and their spin-out company Amaero, have printed two engines. One is on display this week at the International Air Show in Avalon, while the second is displayed in Toulouse at the French aerospace company Microturbo (Safran).

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Video footage and photos of Monash 3D printing in metal

Videos


Photos

Click on images for hi-res versions.

The biggest powder bed 3D printed metal aerospace component is on display at the Melbourne International Airshow at Avalon (2017)

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Barrie Finnin, CEO of Amaero, with a hand on the 3D printed door hinge from a Chinese jet airliner. A 3D printed air intake component is in the foreground.

Barrie Finnin, CEO of Amaero, in front of the original 3D printed jet engine.

A cut away view of a new rocket motor design.

A cut away view of a new rocket motor design.

IMG_6728

The rear view of the 3D printed door hinge from a Chinese jet airliner.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The new rocket motor design and Barrie Finnin, CEO of Amaero.

Monash 3D printed Jet Engine (2015)

 

Monash Jet Engine (click for hi-res)

Monash Jet Engine

Professor Xinhua Wu with the printed engine. Credit: Monash University

Professor Xinhua Wu. Credit: Monash University

 

Monash Jet Engine on display at the Avalon Airshow

Monash’s printed Jet Engine (low res)

The engine on display

Monash’s printed Jet Engine

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Monash Jet Engine on display at the Avalon Airshow. Credit: Science in Public

SONY DSC

Monash Jet Engine on display at the Avalon Airshow. Credit: Science in Public

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Monash Jet Engine on display at the Avalon Airshow (David Lyster, Manager of Research Partnership at Monash University in background). Credit: Science in Public

 

Printing in metal. One of the metal laser printers at the Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing. (Credit: MCAM)

Printing in metal. One of the metal laser printers at the Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing. (Credit: MCAM)

Printed jet engine. Credit: Science in Public

Printed jet engine. Credit: Science in Public

3D metal structures printed at MCAM. Credit: Science in Public

Demonstrating the intricacy possible with metallic 3D printing. Credit: Science in Public

The world’s first 3D printed jet engine – backgrounder 

Background information

This is a summary of resources supporting the ‘World’s first 3D printed jet engine’ and ‘Melbourne’s 3D jet engine technology flies into production in France’. Media releases, online copy and live links at www.scienceinpublic.com.au/monash-uni

HD footage of the printing machines and the engine

Monash University: Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing

Shows: 3D printed metal parts, Professor Xinhua Wu with printed jet engine, Concept Laser X-Line 1000R machine (powder bed 3D printing machine – the largest selective laser melting (SLM) machine currently available), laser over base plate in blown powder machine, large shot of the blown powder printing machine.

For HD images visit: www.scienceinpublic.com.au/monash-uni/photos-jet-engine

Web links

Amaero: www.amaero.com.au

Monash Centre for Additive Manufacturing: https://platforms.monash.edu/mcam

Safran: www.safran-group.com

ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals: www.arclightmetals.org.au/index.html

Additive manufacturing (3D printing)

3D printing has been used since the 1980s by the aerospace industry, usually to produce prototypes. With more complex, expensive printing machines being built in recent years (such as those with lasers to melt metal powders – used by MCAM), more opportunities for different materials and therefore different applications are opening up. Printing in metals has its challenges, including the high temperatures required and safety issues that accompany them.

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