The Australia-Indonesia Centre

\"AusThe Australia-Indonesia Centre brings together leading research institutions, business and government in both nations to build stronger relationships and cultural understandings, and to create lasting impact from collaborative research.

More about the Centre at: http://australiaindonesiacentre.org

And read the Stories of Australia-Indonesia Innovation publication at: http://stories.scienceinpublic.com.au/indonesia, which was supported by The Australia-Indonesia Centre.

Improving rail safety in Indonesia and Australia

The sweet spot for rail repair vs efficiency

24 November 2017

Computer models to predict how railcars will respond to different track conditions are being developed by Indonesian and Australian researchers, to improve rail safety and efficiency in both countries.

They’ve already created a successful model for passenger carriages, which has been validated against the performance of trains in Indonesia. Now the researchers are working on models for freight trains.

“For railways, it’s standard practice to measure the conditions of the track periodically,” says Dr Nithurshan Nadarajah, a research engineer at the Institute of Railway Technology at Monash University.

[click to continue…]

Smarter electrification: providing energy isn’t enough 

Four years ago life in Pulau Bau, a village on a tiny island off North Maluku in Indonesia, was transformed. The community was supplied with electricity via small-scale diesel generators and a state-of-the-art solar energy system with battery backup.

Every house was receiving some electricity—not a lot, but some. But early in 2017 the system broke down, and the cost to repair it (equivalent to AUD$20,000) was beyond the budget of the community.

The Indonesian government is committed to providing energy to all citizens by 2020. It isn’t going to be easy for a 5,150km-long archipelago where more than 65 million people, many in remote communities, currently go without.

An Australia-Indonesia Centre project is working to identify the opportunities and challenges in meeting the real needs of these communities.Technology alone won’t deliver. The solutions will need to be tailored to community aspirations, and be resilient so they keep working when the engineers go home.

“There’s a gap between the provision of technology and the development of capacity to maintain that supply,” says Dr Sebastian Thomas, a climate and sustainability researcher with The Australia-Indonesia Centre and The University of Melbourne who is co-leading the work.
[click to continue…]

What could giant batteries mean for Indonesian energy?

In response to blackouts and concerns over energy supply, South Australia is getting the world’s largest lithium-ion battery. What exactly does this mean for the future of energy in Australia, and could such an approach work for Indonesia?

“The announcement of the Neoen and Tesla investment in a 100MW/129MWh battery adjacent to the Hornsdale wind-farm in South Australia is ground-breaking, and clearly foreshadows the shape of the Australian energy future,” says Dr Ariel Liebman, Co-Lead of the Australia-Indonesia Centre Energy Cluster and Deputy Director of the Monash Energy Materials and Systems Institute (MEMSI).

“However, we shouldn’t get too complacent because there are still significant challenges in turning this kind of activity into business-as-usual.

[click to continue…]

Radar-in-a-suitcase makes bridges safer

Assessing ageing bridges just got safer and easier, thanks to a high-tech radar device that fits inside a suitcase.

Developed by Dr Lihai Zhang of The University of Melbourne as part of a collaborative research project supported by The Australia-Indonesia Centre, the IBIS-S radar technology can scan a bridge in 15 minutes from a kilometre away with an accuracy of 0.01mm, quickly assessing its condition and stability.

[click to continue…]

Detecting high risk pregnancies in Indonesia

Women in Indonesia were 21 times more likely to die from childbirth than women in Australia in 2015. Many pregnant women in Indonesia, particularly in remote areas, do not regularly visit health clinics and so complications are not detected and dealt with early enough.

[click to continue…]

Breeding mosquitoes; turning Aussie wheat into Indonesian exports; connecting land and sea; the first 1,000 days of life

Aus indo logoToday in Surabaya, the 3rd Indonesia-Australia Research Summit discusses research to change lives including:

  • What happens when islands and remote communities get electricity? How does 24/7 power change families, businesses, and hierarchies?
  • Families hatching and releasing mosquitoes to fight dengue
  • Joint competitive advantage – working together to build our economies
    • Australian wheat becomes Indonesian noodles for global export
    • Australian cotton and rayon transform into Indonesian fashion exports
  • How higher education in Indonesia and Australia can drive national innovation goals
  • Building sustainable and resilient port cities
    • Improving the health of trains and tracks – for port and transport efficiency and safety
    • Creating the infrastructure for electric cars
    • Connecting land and sea in island nations
  • Bringing primary care to communities
    • Finding out who is dying and why – a national register
    • Student experiences in saving mums’ lives
    • Local nutrition resources to fight the obesity epidemic
    • Investing in the first 1,000 days of life in indigenous communities
    • A healthy start to life – the national approach
  • Urban water
    • Water sensitive cities – how to get there in Bogor and Jakarta
    • Eco-technologies for urban rivers
    • Urban flood modelling
  • Energy
    • Remote electrification – stories from the solar frontline
    • Creating a sustainable energy market for millions of Indonesians.

[click to continue…]

Ports that work; saving children’s lives; water smart cities and more

Aus indo logoToday in Surabaya, the 3rd Indonesia-Australia Research Summit with research to change lives including:

  • Making ports that work with rail, road, and the surrounding communities
  • Could vitamin D reduce child deaths?
  • Designing the coolest and most energy-efficient tropical houses
  • What do children learn about diet and nutrition on the street: from advertising to school posters and street rubbish?
  • How do island and remote communities change with access to 24/7 power?

These are some of the challenges being tackled by researchers from 11 Indonesian and Australian universities meeting today and tomorrow in Surabaya for the 3rd Indonesia-Australia Research Summit.

[click to continue…]

Indonesian and Australian scientists test new TB vaccine targets for the TB fight in Indonesia and Australia

World TB Day on March 24 reminds us of the growing TB threat

Scientists available for interview in English and Bahasa Indonesia for World TB Day. Read the release in Bahasa Indonesia.
More images below.

Better vaccines are needed for the global fight against tuberculosis (TB). The Global Fund reports an estimated nine million new cases globally per year of TB, which is second only to AIDS as the world’s most deadly infectious disease. Indonesia had more than 320,000 reported cases in 2014 according to the World Health Organization, while Australia’s reported cases were just over 1,000. But the rise of drug-resistant TB poses a threat to all countries.

Two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium have shown promising results in investigations in mice for a new vaccine. Scientists from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney, with colleagues at Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) in Yogyakarta, have found that the injected proteins can prime the immune system to induce protection against TB in mice.

The team has established a laboratory and immunological techniques to test if the two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium can be used as the basis for a vaccine. Credit: Centenary Institute

The team has established a laboratory and immunological techniques to test if the two proteins from the tuberculosis bacterium can be used as the basis for a vaccine. Credit: Centenary Institute

[click to continue…]

Target-target baru untuk vaksin tuberkulosis

Hari TB Sedunia (25 Maret) mengingatkan kita mengenai ancaman TB yang terus meningkat

Vaksin-vaksin yang lebih baik dibutuhkan agar dapat melawan TB di tingkat global. Global Fund melaporkan sekitar 9 juta kasus TB baru muncul setiap tahunnya, menempati posisi kedua sebagai penyakit menular paling mematikan di dunia setelah AIDS. Menurut Badan Kesehatan Dunia (WHO), lebih dari 320.000 kasus TB dilaporkan di Indonesia pada 2014. Sementara, hanya lebih dari 1.000 kasus TB yang dilaporkan di Australia. Namun, munculnya penyakit TB yang bersifat resistan terhadap obat menimbulkan ancaman bagi seluruh dunia.

[click to continue…]

Can sunshine help prevent pneumonia?

Scientists available for interview in Bahasa Indonesia and English.

Background information here.

Photos here. Read the release in Bahasa Indonesia.

The possibility of a link between vitamin D deficiency and pneumonia is being investigated in two studies by Indonesian and Australian scientists in Indonesia.
They’re tracking the incidence and severity in early childhood of respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, asthma, pneumonia, and bronchiolitis, in hospitals and the community, in the hope of providing more information for treatment and management for respiratory diseases.
#TB and pneumonia - iStock

Researchers are investigating a possible link between pneumonia and a lack of vitamin D.

Pneumonia is the number one killer of children under five in the country, and around six million young Indonesians suffer from it each year, according to a 2008 study. This collaboration is going to update those 2008 figures, and hopefully lower them – while trying to find the causes of it and other respiratory tract infections. [click to continue…]

Can sunshine help prevent pneumonia – background

Read in Bahasa Indonesia.

In 2008, a study funded by the World Health Organisation, UNICEF and the Gates Foundation estimated that Indonesia was among the top six countries in the world for the number of new cases of pneumonia in children under five, says University of Melbourne PhD student and physician, Dr Vicka Oktaria of Gadjah Mada University.

She is coordinating collaborative research with scientists from Australia and Indonesia, to see if there’s a link between vitamin D deficiency and pneumonia in Indonesian children.

“But that estimate was based on an epidemiological model and most of the data is now 10 years old.”

[click to continue…]

Latar belakang – Dapatkah sinar matahari membantu mencegah pneumonia?

Pada tahun 2008, sebuah penelitian yang didanai oleh World Health Organisation, UNICEF, dan Gates Foundation memperkirakan bahwa Indonesia berada di antara enam negara teratas di dunia untuk jumlah kasus baru pneumonia (radang paru-paru) pada balita, kata mahasiswa PhD di University of Melbourne yang juga seorang dokter, Vicka Oktaria dari Universitas Gadjah Mada.

Vicka tengah mengoordinasi penelitian gabungan antara para ilmuwan dari Australia dan Indonesia, untuk mengetahui apakah kekurangan vitamin D terkait dengan pneumonia pada anak-anak di Indonesia.

[click to continue…]

Dapatkah sinar matahari membantu mencegah pneumonia?

Para ilmuwan bersedia untuk diwawancarai dalam Bahasa Indonesia dan Bahasa Inggris.

Kemungkinan kaitan antara kekurangan Vitamin D dan pneumonia (radang paru-paru) sedang ditelusuri dalam dua studi di Indonesia yang dilakukan peneliti Indonesia dan Australia.
Tim peneliti menelusuri kejadian dan tingkat keparahan infeksi saluran pernapasan pada anak usia dini, termasuk flu biasa, asma, radang paru-paru, dan bronkiolitis di lingkup rumah sakit dan masyarakat, agar dapat memberikan lebih banyak informasi mengenai cara pengobatan dan penanganan penyakit pernapasan.

 

#TB and pneumonia - iStock

Researchers are investigating a possible link between pneumonia and a lack of vitamin D.

[click to continue…]

Fishing for food security

Scientists available for interview in Bahasa Indonesia and English. More images below. Read the release in Bahasa Indonesia.

Fish form a large part of the diet for many living on small islands. Credit: Australia Indonesia Centre

Fish form a large part of the diet for many living on small islands. Credit: Australia Indonesia Centre

Local fishermen in Indonesia are catching less fish. Whatever the reason, it is a significant problem for those who live on small islands in particular, as fish make up about 90 per cent of the protein they eat.
A team of Indonesian and Australian social scientists is looking at how communities adapt to these changes.

[click to continue…]

Riding the rails to an efficient freight system

Scientists available for interview in Bahasa Indonesia and English. Read the release in Bahasa Indonesia.

From 2016 a specially-equipped standard railcar will be rocking and rolling along the tracks of East Java. It will have carefully positioned sensors to detect its movement during normal operation, including its displacement and vibration.

Improving the rail systems may have far-reaching benefits. Credit:

Improving the rail systems may have far-reaching benefits. Credit: Institute of Railway Technology (IRT)

[click to continue…]

Upaya menuju ketahanan pangan

Para ilmuwan bersedia untuk diwawancarai dalam Bahasa Indonesia dan Bahasa Inggris.

Fish form a large part of the diet for many living on small islands. Credit: Australia Indonesia Centre

Fish form a large part of the diet for many living on small islands. Credit: Australia Indonesia Centre

Jumlah ikan yang ditangkap para nelayan Indonesia semakin berkurang. Apapun alasannya, ini merupakan masalah besar bagi penduduk pulau-pulau kecil karena 90% sumber protein yang mereka berasal dari ikan.

[click to continue…]

Power to the islands

Scientists available for interview in Bahasa Indonesia and English. More images below. 

View the release in Bahasa Indonesia here. Or read about the other collaborative research projects announced with the opening of the Indonesian Clean Energy Centre of Excellence in Bali on Thursday 11 Feb.

Over sixty-five million Indonesians live off the grid. But what does that mean in the era of micro-grids, batteries and efficient solar panels? And how do communities change with 24/7 energy?
Providing reliable electric power is one of the keys to unlocking the potential of the remote islands and landlocked areas of Indonesia and of Australia’s north, a priority for both countries.
How do communities change with 24/7 energy? Indonesian and Australian scientists are working to find out. Credit: Max Richter

How do communities change with 24/7 energy? Indonesian and Australian scientists have study sites, including villages in the Kai Islands, to find out. Credit: Max Richter

[click to continue…]

Power to the people

Indonesia and Australia to research delivering power to remote communities and to grow cities

View the release in Bahasa Indonesia here.

Announcing a portfolio of research projects:

  • To bring sustainable energy to remote communities.
  • To increase the reliability of Indonesia’s urban power.
  • To guide Indonesia as it boosts its electricity generating capacity by 70 per cent.
  • To help Australia decarbonise/move away from coal.
  • Trials in Borneo and Kai Besar (off West Papua).

Researchers available for interview in Bahasa Indonesia and English. More images below.

Today the Indonesian Minister for Energy and Mineral Resources, Sudirman Said, will open the Indonesian Clean Energy Centre of Excellence in Bali, with Australia to be an important partner in the Centre’s new activities.
Local and national projects assessing clean energy options are underway by Indonesian and Australian scientists. Credit: Max Richter

Local and national projects assessing clean energy options are underway by Indonesian and Australian scientists. Credit: Max Richter

[click to continue…]

Listrik untuk Pulau-Pulau

Para peneliti bersedia untuk diwawancarai dalam Bahasa Indonesia dan Bahasa Inggris. Dan Listrik untuk Masyarakat.

Lebih dari enam puluh lima juta rakyat Indonesia hidup tanpa listrik. Apa maknanya dalam era jaringan mikro, baterai, dan panel surya yang efisien? Bagaimana masyarakat berubah dengan listrik tersedia setiap saat?
Pasokan listrik yang andal adalah salah satu kunci untuk membuka potensi pulau-pulau terpencil dan kawasan pedalaman di Indonesia dan Australia utara, area yang diprioritaskan oleh kedua negara.
How do communities change with 24/7 energy? Indonesian and Australian scientists have study sites, including villages in the Kai Islands, to find out. Credit: Max Richter

How do communities change with 24/7 energy? Indonesian and Australian scientists have study sites, including villages in the Kai Islands, to find out. Credit: Max Richter

[click to continue…]